Monthly Archives: March 2015

Draft Analysis: NFL Draft Needs: Texans

Written by : Posted on March 31, 2015 : No Comments
This post was originally published on this site

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Evan Silva (@EvanSilva) is the Senior Football Editor for Rotoworld’s NFL Page, and Josh Norris (@JoshNorris) leads Rotoworld’s college football and NFL draft coverage. Together, they’re breaking down every team’s biggest needs and offering potential solutions in May’s draft.

For a breakdown on every team, check out the team-by-team draft preview schedule.

No. 1 Team Need: Quarterback

Silva’s Analysis

The Texans are throwing darts at quarterback, signing Brian Hoyer and Ryan Mallett to similar two-year deals one offseason after using a fourth-round pick on Tom Savage. It’s quite conceivable none of the three is a long-term solution. Solving this need will be a difficult task for GM Rick Smith and coach Bill O’Brien, as there are believed to be only two starting-caliber passers in this year’s draft, and the Texans aren’t scheduled to go on the clock until No. 16.

No. 2 Team Need: Linebacker

Silva’s Analysis

The Texans have needs at both inside and outside linebacker. 2014 No. 1 pick Jadeveon Clowney is a huge question mark coming off microfracture knee surgery, while 2012 first-rounder Whitney Mercilus is a better run defender than pass rusher. Brooks Reed fled to Atlanta in free agency. Overpaid ILB Brian Cushing is injury-plagued and increasingly ineffective, and there’s a hole next to him with Mike Mohamed and Akeem Dent as the top in-house options. My guess is Houston’s linebacker group as a whole will have to be overhauled over the next two offseasons. Running a 3-4 under Romeo Crennel, the Texans badly need another edge rusher and an inside ‘backer capable of blowing up run schemes.

No. 3 Team Need: Wide receiver

Silva’s Analysis

DeAndre Hopkins is an ascending No. 1 receiver who’s not yet 23 years old. Current No. 2 Cecil Shorts is an average talent, and not necessarily a long-term solution. Even if the Texans are satisfied with Shorts, they need a better slot receiver than Damaris Johnson. Other potential needs include tight end, interior offensive line and defensive line depth.

Norris’ Mock Draft

Round 1 (16): WR Devante Parker, Louisville – If you don’t have a quality quarterback, or at least one with consistent placement, why not focus on receivers who win in contested situations or adjusting to the football. DeAndre Hopkins also wins in this area. Parker elevates effortlessly and is a prime target in the red zone. He also offers run after catch potential and seems to be learning the nuances of separation.

Round 2 (51): QB Bryce Petty, Baylor – Buzz points to Petty being selected in the second-round. The Texans, Bills, Eagles and others are all possibilities. Look, I know Petty checks the boxes. Frame, big arm, athleticism. But when one thing breaks down (pressure, covered second read), he cannot compensate. His best chance of success is in a clean pocket, and I question things beyond that.

Round 3 (82): LB Denzel Perryman, Miami – I was surprised when Perryman was mentioned in the first round. I would be shocked if that happened. He is a limited player but is very good attacking downhill. He is aggressive to plow through blocks. In fact, he told me he sees no point in working around blocks. Evan mentioned a strong run defender, and Perryman is just that.

Round 4 (116): EDGE Hau’oli Kikaha, Washington – We have yet to see Kikaha work out, so the combination of that point and an injury history could keep him on the board. Kikaha does not use his athleticism as a crutch, instead he wins with balance, momentum, hand use and separation. He is ahead of the game on counter moves.

Round 5 (152): G Josue Matias, FSU – Matias’ 2013 season was better than 2014. I was a big fan of XSF prior to last year’s draft, but his rookie year was a disappointment. Matias could offer depth at either guard spot.

Round 5 (174): EDGE Markus Golden, Missouri – All power, poor athleticism, bad length. Golden will have to shine in close quarters to be a contributor in the NFL, but at least he understands that and has power in his hands to create space.

Round 6 (194): LB Mike Hull, Penn State – It won’t hurt that Bill O’Brien has a history with Hull. Double dipping at the position makes sense, as Evan pointed out. I could also see Hull drafted in the fourth-round.

Round 6 (211): DL Ray Drew, Georgia – Defensive depth from a prospect who played from a variety of different alignments.

Round 6 (216): WR Deontay Greenberry, Houston – A name that was frequently brought up as a Combine snub. Greenberry has issues catching the football, however, he at least offers vertical speed.

Round 7 (235): DL Daryl Waud, Western Ontario – A  power defensive lineman who caught my eye as a PFA or seventh round selection at the East West Shrine game.

Texans Current Offensive Depth Chart

QB: Brian Hoyer

RB: Arian Foster

WR: DeAndre Hopkins

WR: Cecil Shorts

TE: Garrett Graham

TE: C.J. Fiedorowicz

LT: Duane Brown

LG: Xavier Su’a-Filo

C: Ben Jones

RG: Brandon Brooks

RT: Derek Newton

Texans Current Defensive Depth Chart

LE: J.J. Watt

RE: Jared Crick

NT: Vince Wilfork

OLB: Jadeveon Clowney

OLB: Whitney Mercilus

ILB: Brian Cushing

ILB: Mike Mohamed

CB: Johnathan Joseph

CB: Kareem Jackson

FS: Rahim Moore

SS: D.J. Swearinger

Evan Silva (@EvanSilva) is the Senior Football Editor for Rotoworld’s NFL Page, and Josh Norris (@JoshNorris) leads Rotoworld’s college football and NFL draft coverage. Together, they’re breaking down every team’s biggest needs and offering potential solutions in May’s draft.

For a breakdown on every team, check out the team-by-team draft preview schedule.

No. 1 Team Need: Quarterback

Silva’s Analysis

The Texans are throwing darts at quarterback, signing Brian Hoyer and Ryan Mallett to similar two-year deals one offseason after using a fourth-round pick on Tom Savage. It’s quite conceivable none of the three is a long-term solution. Solving this need will be a difficult task for GM Rick Smith and coach Bill O’Brien, as there are believed to be only two starting-caliber passers in this year’s draft, and the Texans aren’t scheduled to go on the clock until No. 16.

No. 2 Team Need: Linebacker

Silva’s Analysis

The Texans have needs at both inside and outside linebacker. 2014 No. 1 pick Jadeveon Clowney is a huge question mark coming off microfracture knee surgery, while 2012 first-rounder Whitney Mercilus is a better run defender than pass rusher. Brooks Reed fled to Atlanta in free agency. Overpaid ILB Brian Cushing is injury-plagued and increasingly ineffective, and there’s a hole next to him with Mike Mohamed and Akeem Dent as the top in-house options. My guess is Houston’s linebacker group as a whole will have to be overhauled over the next two offseasons. Running a 3-4 under Romeo Crennel, the Texans badly need another edge rusher and an inside ‘backer capable of blowing up run schemes.

No. 3 Team Need: Wide receiver

Silva’s Analysis

DeAndre Hopkins is an ascending No. 1 receiver who’s not yet 23 years old. Current No. 2 Cecil Shorts is an average talent, and not necessarily a long-term solution. Even if the Texans are satisfied with Shorts, they need a better slot receiver than Damaris Johnson. Other potential needs include tight end, interior offensive line and defensive line depth.

Norris’ Mock Draft

Round 1 (16): WR Devante Parker, Louisville – If you don’t have a quality quarterback, or at least one with consistent placement, why not focus on receivers who win in contested situations or adjusting to the football. DeAndre Hopkins also wins in this area. Parker elevates effortlessly and is a prime target in the red zone. He also offers run after catch potential and seems to be learning the nuances of separation.

Round 2 (51): QB Bryce Petty, Baylor – Buzz points to Petty being selected in the second-round. The Texans, Bills, Eagles and others are all possibilities. Look, I know Petty checks the boxes. Frame, big arm, athleticism. But when one thing breaks down (pressure, covered second read), he cannot compensate. His best chance of success is in a clean pocket, and I question things beyond that.

Round 3 (82): LB Denzel Perryman, Miami – I was surprised when Perryman was mentioned in the first round. I would be shocked if that happened. He is a limited player but is very good attacking downhill. He is aggressive to plow through blocks. In fact, he told me he sees no point in working around blocks. Evan mentioned a strong run defender, and Perryman is just that.

Round 4 (116): EDGE Hau’oli Kikaha, Washington – We have yet to see Kikaha work out, so the combination of that point and an injury history could keep him on the board. Kikaha does not use his athleticism as a crutch, instead he wins with balance, momentum, hand use and separation. He is ahead of the game on counter moves.

Round 5 (152): G Josue Matias, FSU – Matias’ 2013 season was better than 2014. I was a big fan of XSF prior to last year’s draft, but his rookie year was a disappointment. Matias could offer depth at either guard spot.

Round 5 (174): EDGE Markus Golden, Missouri – All power, poor athleticism, bad length. Golden will have to shine in close quarters to be a contributor in the NFL, but at least he understands that and has power in his hands to create space.

Round 6 (194): LB Mike Hull, Penn State – It won’t hurt that Bill O’Brien has a history with Hull. Double dipping at the position makes sense, as Evan pointed out. I could also see Hull drafted in the fourth-round.

Round 6 (211): DL Ray Drew, Georgia – Defensive depth from a prospect who played from a variety of different alignments.

Round 6 (216): WR Deontay Greenberry, Houston – A name that was frequently brought up as a Combine snub. Greenberry has issues catching the football, however, he at least offers vertical speed.

Round 7 (235): DL Daryl Waud, Western Ontario – A  power defensive lineman who caught my eye as a PFA or seventh round selection at the East West Shrine game.

Texans Current Offensive Depth Chart

QB: Brian Hoyer

RB: Arian Foster

WR: DeAndre Hopkins

WR: Cecil Shorts

TE: Garrett Graham

TE: C.J. Fiedorowicz

LT: Duane Brown

LG: Xavier Su’a-Filo

C: Ben Jones

RG: Brandon Brooks

RT: Derek Newton

Texans Current Defensive Depth Chart

LE: J.J. Watt

RE: Jared Crick

NT: Vince Wilfork

OLB: Jadeveon Clowney

OLB: Whitney Mercilus

ILB: Brian Cushing

ILB: Mike Mohamed

CB: Johnathan Joseph

CB: Kareem Jackson

FS: Rahim Moore

SS: D.J. Swearinger

Evan Silva is a senior football editor for Rotoworld.com. He can be found on Twitter .
Email :Evan Silva

Draft Analysis: NFL Draft Needs: Titans

Written by : Posted on March 31, 2015 : No Comments
This post was originally published on this site

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Evan Silva (@EvanSilva) is the Senior Football Editor for Rotoworld’s NFL Page, and Josh Norris (@JoshNorris) leads Rotoworld’s college football and NFL draft coverage. Together, they’re breaking down every team’s biggest needs and offering potential solutions in May’s draft.

For a breakdown on every team, check out the team-by-team draft preview schedule.

No. 1 Team Need: General Manager

Silva’s Analysis

Ruston Webster is the worst GM in all the NFL.

No. 2 Team Need: Quarterback

Silva’s Analysis

Zach Mettenberger showed some promising traits as a rookie. He is firm in the pocket and willing to pull the trigger on difficult throws. He is also painfully short on athleticism and an erratic passer. The Titans’ front office could buy itself another year by using the No. 2 overall pick on a quarterback. They could play Mettenberger in 2015, and trade one if the other hits. Either way, the mere fact that Mettenberger “flashed” in year one should in no way prevent the Titans from continuing to invest at quarterback. Mettenberger was a sixth-round pick and has numerous deficiencies, and ultimately the odds are against him being Tennessee’s long-term answer under center. With Odell Beckham, Jarvis Landry, Jeremy Hill, Trai Turner, La’El Collins and Alfred Blue, there’s a reason LSU’s 2013 offense was held back.

No. 3 Team Need: Running back

Silva’s Analysis

Regardless of whether the Titans rest on their laurels with Mettenberger, they’re going to have a young quarterback under center. In order to support that young quarterback in his development, they need a way to sustain offense and create manageable down-and-distance situations. A soft runner without chain-moving capability, 2014 second-round pick Bishop Sankey is best suited to a change-up role. Holdover passing-down back Dexter McCluster is an ineffective gadget guy, while soon-to-be 30-year-old Shonn Greene‘s strength is plodding. Tennessee needs a big-time bellcow runner to make effective use of an offensive line in which the Titans have invested two first-round picks (LT Taylor Lewan, RG Chance Warmack) and a $46.8 million contract (LG Andy Levitre). The Titans have very few valuable assets. They need to stop letting the few assets they do have go to waste.

No. 4 Team Need: Right tackle

Silva’s Analysis

Before free agency, Jim Wyatt of the Nashville Tennessean appeared on Andy Benoit’s MMQB Podcast and was asked to name the Titans’ needs. He literally named every position on the roster. In addition to quarterback, running back and right tackle, defensive line and wide receiver are question-mark spots. I’m going with right tackle here because it would appear to be the Titans’ most-glaring need. 2014 signing Michael Oher was a predictable free-agent flop, and Lewan’s move to the blind side creates a hole opposite him. The 2015 Titans will need to be able to run the football to stay competitive in games. Therefore, they could really use a road-grading mauler at right tackle capable of opening up running lanes.

Norris’ Mock Draft

Round 1 (2): QB Marcus Mariota, Oregon – I don’t see how Ken Whisenhunt and Co. can stick with a sixth-round quarterback who is confined to the pocket, with a slow process and has finished the last two seasons injured. Teams are rarely in a position to select a quarterback prospect of Mariota’s caliber. He has foundation traits that can succeed in a number of offenses. If the Titans do stick with Mettenberger, win five or six games in 2015, will they be in position to select a passer next season? In a possible make or break year? I do think the Chargers link has some legs, even it does not end up happening. Take Mariota.

Round 2 (33): T T.J. Clemmings, Pitt – Evan asked for a mauling right tackle, and Clemmings is just that. Do not expect him to start right away unless teams are comfortable with the high number of negative snaps he will give early on. Clemmings does not trust his feet to get and stay in position. That means he is giving up edge pressure and then inside lines once compensating for the outside lane. I don’t see a team selecting Clemmings in the first despite what is commonly projected.

Round 3 (66): RB T.J. Yeldon, Alabama – Yeldon could be selected as early as the second running back off the board. He is smooth, aggressive and falls forward on contact. I could not use many of those words to describe Bishop Sankey.

Round 4 (100): EDGE Lorenzo Mauldin, Louisville -Mauldin is not a special pass rusher. He is adequate at best in that area. I am not naive enough to think everyone shares my opinion of Mauldin, as other could see Mauldin as a serviceable starter. He might fit best as a drop EDGE in an odd man front.

Round 5 (138): WR Kenny Bell, Nebraska – Bell was slated to appear at the East West Shrine game but did not attend. If he did, I bet more would be written about him. Bell is very athletic and fluid, flashing each downfield on contested catches.

Round 6 (176): OL Jarvis Harrison, Texas A&M – Harrison’s talent warrants a much earlier selection, which is absolutely possible. Anonymous scouts have pointed out Harrison’s “heart might not be in” the game. Gil Brandt noted Harrison even showed up late to his pro day. He is the ultimate utility lineman.

Round 6 (207): S Detrick Bonner, Virginia Tech – Bonner has played a number of spots in the defensive backfield” corner, slot, strong and free safety. sixth and seventh-round selection are mostly treated as priority free agents that your team has exclusive rights to.

Titans Current Offensive Depth Chart

QB: Zach Mettenberger

RB: Bishop Sankey

WR: Kendall Wright

WR: Justin Hunter

WR: Harry Douglas

TE: Delanie Walker

LT: Taylor Lewan

LG: Andy Levitre

C: Brian Schwenke

RG: Chance Warmack

RT: Byron Stingily

Titans Current Defensive Depth Chart

LE: Ropati Pitoitua

RE: Jurrell Casey

NT: Sammie Lee Hill

OLB: Brian Orakpo

OLB: Derrick Morgan

ILB: Avery Williamson

ILB: Zach Brown

CB: Jason McCourty

CB: Perrish Cox

FS: Michael Griffin

SS: Da’Norris Searcy

Evan Silva (@EvanSilva) is the Senior Football Editor for Rotoworld’s NFL Page, and Josh Norris (@JoshNorris) leads Rotoworld’s college football and NFL draft coverage. Together, they’re breaking down every team’s biggest needs and offering potential solutions in May’s draft.

For a breakdown on every team, check out the team-by-team draft preview schedule.

No. 1 Team Need: General Manager

Silva’s Analysis

Ruston Webster is the worst GM in all the NFL.

No. 2 Team Need: Quarterback

Silva’s Analysis

Zach Mettenberger showed some promising traits as a rookie. He is firm in the pocket and willing to pull the trigger on difficult throws. He is also painfully short on athleticism and an erratic passer. The Titans’ front office could buy itself another year by using the No. 2 overall pick on a quarterback. They could play Mettenberger in 2015, and trade one if the other hits. Either way, the mere fact that Mettenberger “flashed” in year one should in no way prevent the Titans from continuing to invest at quarterback. Mettenberger was a sixth-round pick and has numerous deficiencies, and ultimately the odds are against him being Tennessee’s long-term answer under center. With Odell Beckham, Jarvis Landry, Jeremy Hill, Trai Turner, La’El Collins and Alfred Blue, there’s a reason LSU’s 2013 offense was held back.

No. 3 Team Need: Running back

Silva’s Analysis

Regardless of whether the Titans rest on their laurels with Mettenberger, they’re going to have a young quarterback under center. In order to support that young quarterback in his development, they need a way to sustain offense and create manageable down-and-distance situations. A soft runner without chain-moving capability, 2014 second-round pick Bishop Sankey is best suited to a change-up role. Holdover passing-down back Dexter McCluster is an ineffective gadget guy, while soon-to-be 30-year-old Shonn Greene‘s strength is plodding. Tennessee needs a big-time bellcow runner to make effective use of an offensive line in which the Titans have invested two first-round picks (LT Taylor Lewan, RG Chance Warmack) and a $46.8 million contract (LG Andy Levitre). The Titans have very few valuable assets. They need to stop letting the few assets they do have go to waste.

No. 4 Team Need: Right tackle

Silva’s Analysis

Before free agency, Jim Wyatt of the Nashville Tennessean appeared on Andy Benoit’s MMQB Podcast and was asked to name the Titans’ needs. He literally named every position on the roster. In addition to quarterback, running back and right tackle, defensive line and wide receiver are question-mark spots. I’m going with right tackle here because it would appear to be the Titans’ most-glaring need. 2014 signing Michael Oher was a predictable free-agent flop, and Lewan’s move to the blind side creates a hole opposite him. The 2015 Titans will need to be able to run the football to stay competitive in games. Therefore, they could really use a road-grading mauler at right tackle capable of opening up running lanes.

Norris’ Mock Draft

Round 1 (2): QB Marcus Mariota, Oregon – I don’t see how Ken Whisenhunt and Co. can stick with a sixth-round quarterback who is confined to the pocket, with a slow process and has finished the last two seasons injured. Teams are rarely in a position to select a quarterback prospect of Mariota’s caliber. He has foundation traits that can succeed in a number of offenses. If the Titans do stick with Mettenberger, win five or six games in 2015, will they be in position to select a passer next season? In a possible make or break year? I do think the Chargers link has some legs, even it does not end up happening. Take Mariota.

Round 2 (33): T T.J. Clemmings, Pitt – Evan asked for a mauling right tackle, and Clemmings is just that. Do not expect him to start right away unless teams are comfortable with the high number of negative snaps he will give early on. Clemmings does not trust his feet to get and stay in position. That means he is giving up edge pressure and then inside lines once compensating for the outside lane. I don’t see a team selecting Clemmings in the first despite what is commonly projected.

Round 3 (66): RB T.J. Yeldon, Alabama – Yeldon could be selected as early as the second running back off the board. He is smooth, aggressive and falls forward on contact. I could not use many of those words to describe Bishop Sankey.

Round 4 (100): EDGE Lorenzo Mauldin, Louisville -Mauldin is not a special pass rusher. He is adequate at best in that area. I am not naive enough to think everyone shares my opinion of Mauldin, as other could see Mauldin as a serviceable starter. He might fit best as a drop EDGE in an odd man front.

Round 5 (138): WR Kenny Bell, Nebraska – Bell was slated to appear at the East West Shrine game but did not attend. If he did, I bet more would be written about him. Bell is very athletic and fluid, flashing each downfield on contested catches.

Round 6 (176): OL Jarvis Harrison, Texas A&M – Harrison’s talent warrants a much earlier selection, which is absolutely possible. Anonymous scouts have pointed out Harrison’s “heart might not be in” the game. Gil Brandt noted Harrison even showed up late to his pro day. He is the ultimate utility lineman.

Round 6 (207): S Detrick Bonner, Virginia Tech – Bonner has played a number of spots in the defensive backfield” corner, slot, strong and free safety. sixth and seventh-round selection are mostly treated as priority free agents that your team has exclusive rights to.

Titans Current Offensive Depth Chart

QB: Zach Mettenberger

RB: Bishop Sankey

WR: Kendall Wright

WR: Justin Hunter

WR: Harry Douglas

TE: Delanie Walker

LT: Taylor Lewan

LG: Andy Levitre

C: Brian Schwenke

RG: Chance Warmack

RT: Byron Stingily

Titans Current Defensive Depth Chart

LE: Ropati Pitoitua

RE: Jurrell Casey

NT: Sammie Lee Hill

OLB: Brian Orakpo

OLB: Derrick Morgan

ILB: Avery Williamson

ILB: Zach Brown

CB: Jason McCourty

CB: Perrish Cox

FS: Michael Griffin

SS: Da’Norris Searcy

Evan Silva is a senior football editor for Rotoworld.com. He can be found on Twitter .
Email :Evan Silva

Offseason Low Down: Where will Peterson Land?

Written by : Posted on March 30, 2015 : No Comments
This post was originally published on this site

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Here’s what we know: Adrian Peterson will be in the NFL next season. As for what team he’ll be suiting up for? That’s anyone’s guess.

Peterson’s uncertain future has the whole league sweating, particularly the Minnesota Vikings, who are scared to death of losing their franchise running back. Here are three teams that should be in the mix for Peterson, and four others who could make things interesting.

The Contenders

ARIZONA CARDINALS

In many ways, this would be the ideal landing spot for Peterson. Arizona was a quarterback away from making noise in the NFC last season. With Carson Palmer on the mend, the Cardinals should be right back in the thick of things in 2015. We all know winning is important to Peterson. Of all the teams vying for Peterson, Arizona may give AP his best chance to win a ring.

It’s no secret the Cards are looking to upgrade at running back. Andre Ellington imploded like a dying star last season, limping his way to a paltry 3.3 yards per carry. At 5’9” and 199 pounds, he isn’t built to be an NFL workhorse. Peterson is.

Acquiring Peterson would require some clever maneuvering on Arizona’s part. Even after Palmer and Larry Fitzgerald agreed to contract restructures, the Cards only have about $9 million in cap space. Between $5 and $6 million of that will go to rookie contracts. Absorbing Peterson’s gargantuan $12.75 million cap hit for next season, a number that rises in 2016 and again the next season, will be tough to pull off. The best piece Arizona can offer is the 24th pick in the draft.

DALLAS COWBOYS

Fantasy owners have to be licking their chops at this possibility. The need is definitely there for Dallas after losing DeMarco Murray to division rival Philadelphia and replacing him with underachieving Darren McFadden. AP can run hog-wild behind the Cowboys’ formidable offensive line. Peterson’s off-field issues shouldn’t deter Dallas, especially after taking a flier on loose cannon Greg Hardy. AT&T Stadium is only a two-hour drive from Peterson’s hometown of Palestine and the running back’s affinity for Dallas is well documented.

It seems like a perfect fit, until you look at the Cowboys’ financial situation. Only the wildly mismanaged Saints have less cap space than Dallas. Even if the Cowboys cut Brandon Carr, Tony Romo restructures his deal and Dez Bryant agrees to a team-friendly extension (which will never happen), finding enough cap room for Peterson would still be a challenge. It may be safer for Dallas to simply grab Wisconsin running back Melvin Gordon at the end of the first round.

MINNESOTA VIKINGS

If we’re taking Peterson’s agent at his word, AP wants out of Minnesota. That’s all well and good, but Peterson still has three years left on his contract. He’s the highest-paid running back in the game and should be for a long time. Peterson can threaten to sit out, but we know how that usually turns out. Like it or not, the Vikings hold all the cards here. If Minnesota doesn’t get an offer it likes, Peterson is stuck playing there. And if he holds out, he won’t get his $12.75 million. It’s that simple.

And let’s face it, Peterson IS a great fit for the Vikings. He always has been. With AP eating up yards at a steady clip, second and third downs will be much more manageable for promising young quarterback Teddy Bridgewater. The Vikings went 7-9 with Matt Asiata and Jerick McKinnon sharing the rock last season, so it’s not unreasonable to think Minnesota could win ten or more games with Peterson moving the chains. Certainly Peterson’s pride has been wounded, but if he can get past whatever perceived wrongs the Vikings committed, he may realize his best bet is to stay with the team that drafted him.

Don’t forget, for the latest on everything NFL, check out Rotoworld’s Player News, or follow @Rotoworld_FB and @JessePantuosco on Twitter.

The Long Shots

ATLANTA FALCONS

After basically punting free agency, Atlanta is one of the few teams left that can afford Peterson without ripping its roster apart. With Steven Jackson gone, Atlanta now features the lackluster backfield tandem of Devonta Freeman and Antone Smith. Even in the bleak NFC South, that’s not good enough.

The Falcons may have to face a harsh reality with Julio Jones heading into the final year of his contract. If the two sides can’t agree to an extension, and the franchise tag is too pricey, the Falcons risk losing Jones for nothing. A Jones for Peterson trade would be the blockbuster to end all blockbusters.

Of course, the odds of this happening are slim to none. Jones is the best weapon Matt Ryan has ever had and he’s only 26. Peterson just turned 30. In a passing league, Jones is far more valuable than an aging Peterson. The Falcons are going to do whatever it takes to keep Jones in Atlanta. Trading Peterson for Jones would be a last ditch effort and it wouldn’t make the Falcons’ fan base too happy.

NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS

Never count out the Patriots. For a no-nonsense guy, Bill Belichick sure takes on a lot of reclamation projects. LeGarrette Blount, Corey Dillon, Albert Haynesworth, Chad Johnson and Randy Moss are just a few of the many high-maintenance players who have come through New England during Belichick’s tenure. The controversial Peterson fits the same mold.

New England lost Stevan Ridley and Shane Vereen this offseason, leaving them with Blount, Travaris Cadet and Jonas Gray at running back. This anonymous group could become even weaker when Blount’s contract expires at the end of the year. Offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels has made it work with spare parts before, but having an every-down back like Peterson would certainly take a load off Tom Brady’s aging shoulders. After passing on Darrelle Revis in free agency, the Patriots may have just enough dough to make that happen. And if they need more, Brady should be more than willing to restructure his contract. He took less money so the Patriots could pursue Wes Welker two offseasons ago.

SAN DIEGO CHARGERS

Peterson for Philip Rivers, anyone? Hear me out. Rivers is entering the final year of his deal and the team seems content to let him hit the market. The Chargers’ recent interest in Oregon QB Marcus Mariota shows they are already preparing for life after Rivers. After originally saying it didn’t matter, Rivers has backtracked a bit on his willingness to relocate to Los Angeles, which seems like a real possibility for the Chargers if they can work out a joint stadium agreement with the Raiders.

The Chargers also have an opening at running back after losing Ryan Mathews in free agency. Many scouts question Todd Gurley’s durability, making the University of Georgia running back a reach for the Chargers at pick No. 17. Peterson is the game-changing back San Diego has lacked since LaDainian Tomlinson left five years ago.

Of course, swapping Peterson for Rivers would be a gut punch to Bridgewater, who was arguably the league’s most competent rookie quarterback last season. The Vikings would have to decide if one year of Rivers is worth disrupting Bridgewater’s long-term development. As solid as he looked last season, Bridgewater’s ceiling is still a bit of a mystery.

TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS

There’s certainly some optimism in Tampa as Jameis Winston, the Bucs’ likely first-round pick, could be the most talented QB prospect we’ve seen since Andrew Luck. Doug Martin has bottomed out since his breakout year in 2012, leaving the Bucs with an underwhelming backfield. Coming off a season where he barely played, a fresh Peterson could fix that in a hurry.

The Buccaneers showed mild interest in Peterson earlier this offseason but that doesn’t mean the feeling is mutual. Even with Winston under center, Tampa Bay is a long way off from being competitive. At 30, Peterson doesn’t have time to waste. He needs to win now. It’s also uncertain what the Bucs would have to give up to land a talent as monumental as Peterson. It wouldn’t be cheap, that’s for sure.

Here’s what we know: Adrian Peterson will be in the NFL next season. As for what team he’ll be suiting up for? That’s anyone’s guess.

Peterson’s uncertain future has the whole league sweating, particularly the Minnesota Vikings, who are scared to death of losing their franchise running back. Here are three teams that should be in the mix for Peterson, and four others who could make things interesting.

The Contenders

ARIZONA CARDINALS

In many ways, this would be the ideal landing spot for Peterson. Arizona was a quarterback away from making noise in the NFC last season. With Carson Palmer on the mend, the Cardinals should be right back in the thick of things in 2015. We all know winning is important to Peterson. Of all the teams vying for Peterson, Arizona may give AP his best chance to win a ring.

It’s no secret the Cards are looking to upgrade at running back. Andre Ellington imploded like a dying star last season, limping his way to a paltry 3.3 yards per carry. At 5’9” and 199 pounds, he isn’t built to be an NFL workhorse. Peterson is.

Acquiring Peterson would require some clever maneuvering on Arizona’s part. Even after Palmer and Larry Fitzgerald agreed to contract restructures, the Cards only have about $9 million in cap space. Between $5 and $6 million of that will go to rookie contracts. Absorbing Peterson’s gargantuan $12.75 million cap hit for next season, a number that rises in 2016 and again the next season, will be tough to pull off. The best piece Arizona can offer is the 24th pick in the draft.

DALLAS COWBOYS

Fantasy owners have to be licking their chops at this possibility. The need is definitely there for Dallas after losing DeMarco Murray to division rival Philadelphia and replacing him with underachieving Darren McFadden. AP can run hog-wild behind the Cowboys’ formidable offensive line. Peterson’s off-field issues shouldn’t deter Dallas, especially after taking a flier on loose cannon Greg Hardy. AT&T Stadium is only a two-hour drive from Peterson’s hometown of Palestine and the running back’s affinity for Dallas is well documented.

It seems like a perfect fit, until you look at the Cowboys’ financial situation. Only the wildly mismanaged Saints have less cap space than Dallas. Even if the Cowboys cut Brandon Carr, Tony Romo restructures his deal and Dez Bryant agrees to a team-friendly extension (which will never happen), finding enough cap room for Peterson would still be a challenge. It may be safer for Dallas to simply grab Wisconsin running back Melvin Gordon at the end of the first round.

MINNESOTA VIKINGS

If we’re taking Peterson’s agent at his word, AP wants out of Minnesota. That’s all well and good, but Peterson still has three years left on his contract. He’s the highest-paid running back in the game and should be for a long time. Peterson can threaten to sit out, but we know how that usually turns out. Like it or not, the Vikings hold all the cards here. If Minnesota doesn’t get an offer it likes, Peterson is stuck playing there. And if he holds out, he won’t get his $12.75 million. It’s that simple.

And let’s face it, Peterson IS a great fit for the Vikings. He always has been. With AP eating up yards at a steady clip, second and third downs will be much more manageable for promising young quarterback Teddy Bridgewater. The Vikings went 7-9 with Matt Asiata and Jerick McKinnon sharing the rock last season, so it’s not unreasonable to think Minnesota could win ten or more games with Peterson moving the chains. Certainly Peterson’s pride has been wounded, but if he can get past whatever perceived wrongs the Vikings committed, he may realize his best bet is to stay with the team that drafted him.

Don’t forget, for the latest on everything NFL, check out Rotoworld’s Player News, or follow @Rotoworld_FB and @JessePantuosco on Twitter.

The Long Shots

ATLANTA FALCONS

After basically punting free agency, Atlanta is one of the few teams left that can afford Peterson without ripping its roster apart. With Steven Jackson gone, Atlanta now features the lackluster backfield tandem of Devonta Freeman and Antone Smith. Even in the bleak NFC South, that’s not good enough.

The Falcons may have to face a harsh reality with Julio Jones heading into the final year of his contract. If the two sides can’t agree to an extension, and the franchise tag is too pricey, the Falcons risk losing Jones for nothing. A Jones for Peterson trade would be the blockbuster to end all blockbusters.

Of course, the odds of this happening are slim to none. Jones is the best weapon Matt Ryan has ever had and he’s only 26. Peterson just turned 30. In a passing league, Jones is far more valuable than an aging Peterson. The Falcons are going to do whatever it takes to keep Jones in Atlanta. Trading Peterson for Jones would be a last ditch effort and it wouldn’t make the Falcons’ fan base too happy.

NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS

Never count out the Patriots. For a no-nonsense guy, Bill Belichick sure takes on a lot of reclamation projects. LeGarrette Blount, Corey Dillon, Albert Haynesworth, Chad Johnson and Randy Moss are just a few of the many high-maintenance players who have come through New England during Belichick’s tenure. The controversial Peterson fits the same mold.

New England lost Stevan Ridley and Shane Vereen this offseason, leaving them with Blount, Travaris Cadet and Jonas Gray at running back. This anonymous group could become even weaker when Blount’s contract expires at the end of the year. Offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels has made it work with spare parts before, but having an every-down back like Peterson would certainly take a load off Tom Brady’s aging shoulders. After passing on Darrelle Revis in free agency, the Patriots may have just enough dough to make that happen. And if they need more, Brady should be more than willing to restructure his contract. He took less money so the Patriots could pursue Wes Welker two offseasons ago.

SAN DIEGO CHARGERS

Peterson for Philip Rivers, anyone? Hear me out. Rivers is entering the final year of his deal and the team seems content to let him hit the market. The Chargers’ recent interest in Oregon QB Marcus Mariota shows they are already preparing for life after Rivers. After originally saying it didn’t matter, Rivers has backtracked a bit on his willingness to relocate to Los Angeles, which seems like a real possibility for the Chargers if they can work out a joint stadium agreement with the Raiders.

The Chargers also have an opening at running back after losing Ryan Mathews in free agency. Many scouts question Todd Gurley’s durability, making the University of Georgia running back a reach for the Chargers at pick No. 17. Peterson is the game-changing back San Diego has lacked since LaDainian Tomlinson left five years ago.

Of course, swapping Peterson for Rivers would be a gut punch to Bridgewater, who was arguably the league’s most competent rookie quarterback last season. The Vikings would have to decide if one year of Rivers is worth disrupting Bridgewater’s long-term development. As solid as he looked last season, Bridgewater’s ceiling is still a bit of a mystery.

TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS

There’s certainly some optimism in Tampa as Jameis Winston, the Bucs’ likely first-round pick, could be the most talented QB prospect we’ve seen since Andrew Luck. Doug Martin has bottomed out since his breakout year in 2012, leaving the Bucs with an underwhelming backfield. Coming off a season where he barely played, a fresh Peterson could fix that in a hurry.

The Buccaneers showed mild interest in Peterson earlier this offseason but that doesn’t mean the feeling is mutual. Even with Winston under center, Tampa Bay is a long way off from being competitive. At 30, Peterson doesn’t have time to waste. He needs to win now. It’s also uncertain what the Bucs would have to give up to land a talent as monumental as Peterson. It wouldn’t be cheap, that’s for sure.

Jesse Pantuosco is a football writer for Rotoworld. He is a three-time Fantasy Sports Writers Association award-winner. Follow him on Twitter @JessePantuosco.
Email :Jesse Pantuosco

Civil and Sociable Applications of Drones

Written by : Posted on March 30, 2015 : No Comments

Civil and Sociable Applications of Drones

Drones have necessitated formidable technology that help with diverse business of societies. They make reference to airplanes that step at supersonic rates of speed that can cover a diverse section, subject to their callings.cheap paper Drones are during the past designed to defend nations next to terrorists, marketplace supplements, and keep control of edge issues. Even so, with up and coming needs proficient systems in deals, agencies have was able to cultivate complex drones which can accomplish a range of professional services. Countless organizations and nations around the world have embraced drones on their on a daily basis work, owing to their mobility and advantage (Oliver, 2013).

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Draft Analysis: NFL Draft Needs: Colts

Written by : Posted on March 30, 2015 : No Comments
This post was originally published on this site

Monday, March 30, 2015

Evan Silva (@EvanSilva) is the Senior Football Editor for Rotoworld’s NFL Page, and Josh Norris (@JoshNorris) leads Rotoworld’s college football and NFL draft coverage. Together, they’re breaking down every team’s biggest needs and offering potential draft-day solutions.

For a breakdown on every team, check out the team-by-team draft preview schedule.

 

No. 1 Team Need:  Safety

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

Incumbent FS Mike Adams is coming off a renaissance season, but turned 34 in March. Special teamer Winston Guy currently sits atop the strong safety depth chart. The Colts play press-man coverage at cornerback, and require range from their free safety. They need to start thinking about Adams’ eventual successor. They also need an immediate starter at strong safety. Coach Chuck Pagano likes to use his strong safety as a tone setter in the box.

 

No. 2 Team Need: Offensive Line

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

The Colts have a lot of bodies on the offensive line, but only LT Anthony Castonzo and promising sophomore LG Jack Mewhort should be assured starting jobs for 2015. Incumbent RGs Hugh Thornton and Lance Louis have been injury plagued and ineffective on the field, while free agent pickup Todd Herremans is best suited for a “swing” backup role at this stage of his career. Center will be up for grabs between Khaled Holmes and Jonotthan Harrison. RT Gosder Cherilus‘ knees may be shot. Although OC Pep Hamilton smartly embraced a pass-first philosophy last season, the Colts still fancy themselves a power-running team.

 

No. 3 Team Need: Outside linebacker

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

Whether it comes via the defensive line or outside linebacker, the Colts need more pass rush. This was the thinking behind GM Ryan Grigson‘s signing of Trent Cole, but Cole is a mere short-term stopgap entering his age-33 season. Erik Walden is best suited to set the edge in run defense, while 34-year-old Robert Mathis (Achilles’) is headed for reserve/PUP. 2014 fifth-round pick Jonathan Newsome flashed promising pass-rush tools as a rookie, but is probably only a role player. 2013 first-round pick Bjoern Werner is a bust.

Norris’ Mock Draft

Round 1 (29): EDGE Danielle Hunter, LSU – From where projections stand right now — most of which obviously won’t come true — there are not many edge rushers available in the late first round. This pick came down to Hunter and Eli Harold. I received a lot of jokes saying the Colts will target the most unathletic edge player in this spot. We have seen teams try to overcorrect on the athletic spectrum in the past, see the Steelers in 2014. Hunter is an outstanding athlete who is a solid run defender, but he has zero intent when rushing the passer. It is only a feeling, but I suspect coaches and evaluators will want to work with what Hunter offers.

Round 2 (61): SS Jaquiski Tartt, Stamford – Some will say “Tartt can be drafted in the fourth round.” Can he? Do we know he makes it that long? If Landon Collins is available in the first, I bet the Colts make that pick. I bet Tartt is selected earlier than expected due to his big-hitting play style.

Round 3 (93): RB David Cobb, Minnesota – A personal favorite. Cobb will be an awesome long term replacement for Frank Gore and offers somewhat similar traits in terms of beating first contact. He is also comfortable as a receiver. A Combine quad pull, which limited his workouts, could keep him on the board. Yes, something that minor in this deep running back class.

Round 4 (128): T Rob Havenstein, Wisconsin – The Badgers consistently ran behind Havenstein’s side of the line. The right tackle gets wide with his punch which results in losses in pass pro, but he does have strength in the running game.

Round 5 (165): S Kurtis Drummond, Michigan State – Many project Drummond to free safety. I never feel comfortable with safety evaluations. Drummond did play in an aggressive defense that asked him to take reliable angles with good timing.

Round 6 (204): DT Joey Mbu, Houston – Mbu is all effort and little athleticism. I really like Josh Chapman and Zach Kerr, but this would be nice depth.

Round 6 (206): LB Junior Sylvestre, Toledo – Sylvestre could be seen as an “undersized” linebacker when compared to traditional standards. He compensates for the size with athleticism, something the Colts could use behind their starters.

Round 6 (244): Terrance Magee, LSU – Passing-down specialist. Magee might not be a special athlete, but he has a foundation in pass protection and has flashed receiving skills.

Round 6 (255): WR Chris Harper, Cal – A Combine snub. Harper left school early and is more fluid than explosive. His production dropped during his final season.

Colts Current Offensive Depth Chart

 

QB: Andrew Luck

RB: Frank Gore

WR: T.Y. Hilton

WR: Andre Johnson

TE: Dwayne Allen

TE: Coby Fleener

LT: Anthony Castonzo

LG: Jack Mewhort

C: Jonotthan Harrison

RG: Todd Herremans

RT: Gosder Cherilus

 

Colts Current Defensive Depth Chart

 

LE: Kendall Langford

RE: Arthur Jones

NT: Josh Chapman

OLB: Trent Cole

OLB: Erik Walden

ILB: Jerrell Freeman

ILB: D’Qwell Jackson

CB: Vontae Davis

CB: Greg Toler

FS: Mike Adams

SS: Winston Guy

Evan Silva (@EvanSilva) is the Senior Football Editor for Rotoworld’s NFL Page, and Josh Norris (@JoshNorris) leads Rotoworld’s college football and NFL draft coverage. Together, they’re breaking down every team’s biggest needs and offering potential draft-day solutions.

For a breakdown on every team, check out the team-by-team draft preview schedule.

 

No. 1 Team Need:  Safety

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

Incumbent FS Mike Adams is coming off a renaissance season, but turned 34 in March. Special teamer Winston Guy currently sits atop the strong safety depth chart. The Colts play press-man coverage at cornerback, and require range from their free safety. They need to start thinking about Adams’ eventual successor. They also need an immediate starter at strong safety. Coach Chuck Pagano likes to use his strong safety as a tone setter in the box.

 

No. 2 Team Need: Offensive Line

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

The Colts have a lot of bodies on the offensive line, but only LT Anthony Castonzo and promising sophomore LG Jack Mewhort should be assured starting jobs for 2015. Incumbent RGs Hugh Thornton and Lance Louis have been injury plagued and ineffective on the field, while free agent pickup Todd Herremans is best suited for a “swing” backup role at this stage of his career. Center will be up for grabs between Khaled Holmes and Jonotthan Harrison. RT Gosder Cherilus‘ knees may be shot. Although OC Pep Hamilton smartly embraced a pass-first philosophy last season, the Colts still fancy themselves a power-running team.

 

No. 3 Team Need: Outside linebacker

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

Whether it comes via the defensive line or outside linebacker, the Colts need more pass rush. This was the thinking behind GM Ryan Grigson‘s signing of Trent Cole, but Cole is a mere short-term stopgap entering his age-33 season. Erik Walden is best suited to set the edge in run defense, while 34-year-old Robert Mathis (Achilles’) is headed for reserve/PUP. 2014 fifth-round pick Jonathan Newsome flashed promising pass-rush tools as a rookie, but is probably only a role player. 2013 first-round pick Bjoern Werner is a bust.

Norris’ Mock Draft

Round 1 (29): EDGE Danielle Hunter, LSU – From where projections stand right now — most of which obviously won’t come true — there are not many edge rushers available in the late first round. This pick came down to Hunter and Eli Harold. I received a lot of jokes saying the Colts will target the most unathletic edge player in this spot. We have seen teams try to overcorrect on the athletic spectrum in the past, see the Steelers in 2014. Hunter is an outstanding athlete who is a solid run defender, but he has zero intent when rushing the passer. It is only a feeling, but I suspect coaches and evaluators will want to work with what Hunter offers.

Round 2 (61): SS Jaquiski Tartt, Stamford – Some will say “Tartt can be drafted in the fourth round.” Can he? Do we know he makes it that long? If Landon Collins is available in the first, I bet the Colts make that pick. I bet Tartt is selected earlier than expected due to his big-hitting play style.

Round 3 (93): RB David Cobb, Minnesota – A personal favorite. Cobb will be an awesome long term replacement for Frank Gore and offers somewhat similar traits in terms of beating first contact. He is also comfortable as a receiver. A Combine quad pull, which limited his workouts, could keep him on the board. Yes, something that minor in this deep running back class.

Round 4 (128): T Rob Havenstein, Wisconsin – The Badgers consistently ran behind Havenstein’s side of the line. The right tackle gets wide with his punch which results in losses in pass pro, but he does have strength in the running game.

Round 5 (165): S Kurtis Drummond, Michigan State – Many project Drummond to free safety. I never feel comfortable with safety evaluations. Drummond did play in an aggressive defense that asked him to take reliable angles with good timing.

Round 6 (204): DT Joey Mbu, Houston – Mbu is all effort and little athleticism. I really like Josh Chapman and Zach Kerr, but this would be nice depth.

Round 6 (206): LB Junior Sylvestre, Toledo – Sylvestre could be seen as an “undersized” linebacker when compared to traditional standards. He compensates for the size with athleticism, something the Colts could use behind their starters.

Round 6 (244): Terrance Magee, LSU – Passing-down specialist. Magee might not be a special athlete, but he has a foundation in pass protection and has flashed receiving skills.

Round 6 (255): WR Chris Harper, Cal – A Combine snub. Harper left school early and is more fluid than explosive. His production dropped during his final season.

Colts Current Offensive Depth Chart

 

QB: Andrew Luck

RB: Frank Gore

WR: T.Y. Hilton

WR: Andre Johnson

TE: Dwayne Allen

TE: Coby Fleener

LT: Anthony Castonzo

LG: Jack Mewhort

C: Jonotthan Harrison

RG: Todd Herremans

RT: Gosder Cherilus

 

Colts Current Defensive Depth Chart

 

LE: Kendall Langford

RE: Arthur Jones

NT: Josh Chapman

OLB: Trent Cole

OLB: Erik Walden

ILB: Jerrell Freeman

ILB: D’Qwell Jackson

CB: Vontae Davis

CB: Greg Toler

FS: Mike Adams

SS: Winston Guy

Evan Silva is a senior football editor for Rotoworld.com. He can be found on Twitter .
Email :Evan Silva

Draft Analysis: NFL Draft Needs: Jaguars

Written by : Posted on March 30, 2015 : No Comments
This post was originally published on this site

Monday, March 30, 2015

Evan Silva (@EvanSilva) is the Senior Football Editor for Rotoworld’s NFL Page, and Josh Norris (@JoshNorris) leads Rotoworld’s college football and NFL draft coverage. Together, they’re breaking down every team’s biggest needs and offering potential solutions in May’s draft.

For a breakdown on every team, check out the team-by-team draft preview schedule.

No. 1 Team Need: End/Linebacker

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

The Jaguars found their “Otto” linebacker in free agency, signing Dan Skuta to man the strong side. The “Leo” weak-side role was filled inadequately by Chris Clemons last season. In coach Gus Bradley‘s defense, the Leo is generally a long-armed player with explosive edge-rush ability. Aside from the Leo position and arguably middle linebacker, Jacksonville has the pieces in place to field a highly disruptive front seven.

 

No. 2 Team Need: Running back

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

The Jaguars weren’t shy about trying to upgrade their backfield in free agency, targeting DeMarco Murray but ultimately missing out. The top-three tailbacks on Jacksonville’s current depth chart are Denard Robinson, Toby Gerhart and Storm Johnson. Waiver addition Bernard Pierce isn’t the answer. The Jags primarily run a zone-blocking ground game and therefore figure to target a one-cut runner. This is a pressing need as Jacksonville must complement second-year QB Blake Bortles with an efficient and high-volume rushing attack.

 

No. 3 Team Need: Safety

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

The Jaguars have a lot of young talent at cornerback, but are short on experience. The best way for Jacksonville to support that group is with a rangy free safety. SS Johnathan Cyprien is a productive run defender, but has been exposed as a coverage liability through two NFL seasons. Incumbent FS Josh Evans is coming off a miserable year, while free agent pickup Sergio Brown is best suited to special teams. Former Seahawks defensive coordinator Bradley needs to bring his version of Earl Thomas to Jacksonville.

Norris’ Mock Draft

Round 1 (3): EDGE Vic Beasley, Clemson – Perhaps the best fit in this entire draft. In fact, even if Leonard Williams is on the board, I think the Jaguars should select Beasley. He might not have the desired wingspan, but he offers a ridiculous first step, upfield explosion and bend to turn the corner. He can feast from the wide Leo alignment and offers a progressing spin counter move.

Round 2 (36): RB Jay Ajayi, Boise State – Ajayi is a bit of a conundrum. There are plays where he puts it all together: accelerating through lanes created by the offensive line and then creating yards on his own with agility of power. But other times he hesitates at or behind the line of scrimmage and goes down too easily on first contact. Ajayi is one of the draft’s best receiving backs.

Round 3 (67): FS Ifo Ekpre-Olomu, Oregon – Many expect IEO to move to free safety in the NFL, and his skills match the conversion. He was too aggressive and bit on underneath routes which allowed receivers to successfully win downfield. He was also lost in trash when working from the slot. However, Ifo can track sideline to sideline with timing and would be a nice counterpiece to Johnathan Cyprien.

Round 4 (103): LB Ben Heeney, Kansas – A personal favorite. Heeney can be very good if given space to operate. Like many linebackers, he struggles when taking on blocks. However, he is a great athlete and hopefully can package that quickness and explosion to work around blocks in an efficient manner, which is not a negative. He also seems comfortable in coverage.

Round 5 (139): TE Ben Koyack, Notre Dame – Marcedes Lewis is making a boatload of money this year, and this is contract is finished. Julius Thomas does not shine inline, so for 12 personnel, Koyack would be a nice second tight end option. Koyack is also a fine receiver as he was used in an H-back role while Troy Niklas played for Notre Dame.

Round 6 (179): EDGE Marcus Rush, Michigan State – It is difficult to find late round rushers with athleticism and arm length. Maybe the Jaguars have one in mind that is not on my radar. Rush does not have the desired wingspan, but can convert speed to power on the edge. Disruption depth is what he offers.

Round 7 (220): C/G Dillon Day, Miss State – With Austin Pasztor as edge OL depth, Day could fill the interior OL utility role. He plays with tenacity.

 

Jaguars Current Offensive Depth Chart

 

QB: Blake Bortles

RB: Denard Robinson

WR: Allen Robinson

WR: Marqise Lee

TE: Julius Thomas

TE: Marcedes Lewis

LT: Luke Joeckel

LG: Zane Beadles

C: Luke Bowanko

RG: Brandon Linder

RT: Jermey Parnell

 

Jaguars Current Defensive Depth Chart

 

LE: Jared Odrick

RE: Chris Clemons

DT: Sen’Derrick Marks

NT: Roy Miller

MLB: Paul Posluszny

WLB: Telvin Smith

SLB: Dan Skuta

CB: Davon House

CB: Demetrius McCray

FS: Sergio Brown

SS: Johnathan Cyprien

Evan Silva (@EvanSilva) is the Senior Football Editor for Rotoworld’s NFL Page, and Josh Norris (@JoshNorris) leads Rotoworld’s college football and NFL draft coverage. Together, they’re breaking down every team’s biggest needs and offering potential solutions in May’s draft.

For a breakdown on every team, check out the team-by-team draft preview schedule.

No. 1 Team Need: End/Linebacker

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

The Jaguars found their “Otto” linebacker in free agency, signing Dan Skuta to man the strong side. The “Leo” weak-side role was filled inadequately by Chris Clemons last season. In coach Gus Bradley‘s defense, the Leo is generally a long-armed player with explosive edge-rush ability. Aside from the Leo position and arguably middle linebacker, Jacksonville has the pieces in place to field a highly disruptive front seven.

 

No. 2 Team Need: Running back

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

The Jaguars weren’t shy about trying to upgrade their backfield in free agency, targeting DeMarco Murray but ultimately missing out. The top-three tailbacks on Jacksonville’s current depth chart are Denard Robinson, Toby Gerhart and Storm Johnson. Waiver addition Bernard Pierce isn’t the answer. The Jags primarily run a zone-blocking ground game and therefore figure to target a one-cut runner. This is a pressing need as Jacksonville must complement second-year QB Blake Bortles with an efficient and high-volume rushing attack.

 

No. 3 Team Need: Safety

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

The Jaguars have a lot of young talent at cornerback, but are short on experience. The best way for Jacksonville to support that group is with a rangy free safety. SS Johnathan Cyprien is a productive run defender, but has been exposed as a coverage liability through two NFL seasons. Incumbent FS Josh Evans is coming off a miserable year, while free agent pickup Sergio Brown is best suited to special teams. Former Seahawks defensive coordinator Bradley needs to bring his version of Earl Thomas to Jacksonville.

Norris’ Mock Draft

Round 1 (3): EDGE Vic Beasley, Clemson – Perhaps the best fit in this entire draft. In fact, even if Leonard Williams is on the board, I think the Jaguars should select Beasley. He might not have the desired wingspan, but he offers a ridiculous first step, upfield explosion and bend to turn the corner. He can feast from the wide Leo alignment and offers a progressing spin counter move.

Round 2 (36): RB Jay Ajayi, Boise State – Ajayi is a bit of a conundrum. There are plays where he puts it all together: accelerating through lanes created by the offensive line and then creating yards on his own with agility of power. But other times he hesitates at or behind the line of scrimmage and goes down too easily on first contact. Ajayi is one of the draft’s best receiving backs.

Round 3 (67): FS Ifo Ekpre-Olomu, Oregon – Many expect IEO to move to free safety in the NFL, and his skills match the conversion. He was too aggressive and bit on underneath routes which allowed receivers to successfully win downfield. He was also lost in trash when working from the slot. However, Ifo can track sideline to sideline with timing and would be a nice counterpiece to Johnathan Cyprien.

Round 4 (103): LB Ben Heeney, Kansas – A personal favorite. Heeney can be very good if given space to operate. Like many linebackers, he struggles when taking on blocks. However, he is a great athlete and hopefully can package that quickness and explosion to work around blocks in an efficient manner, which is not a negative. He also seems comfortable in coverage.

Round 5 (139): TE Ben Koyack, Notre Dame – Marcedes Lewis is making a boatload of money this year, and this is contract is finished. Julius Thomas does not shine inline, so for 12 personnel, Koyack would be a nice second tight end option. Koyack is also a fine receiver as he was used in an H-back role while Troy Niklas played for Notre Dame.

Round 6 (179): EDGE Marcus Rush, Michigan State – It is difficult to find late round rushers with athleticism and arm length. Maybe the Jaguars have one in mind that is not on my radar. Rush does not have the desired wingspan, but can convert speed to power on the edge. Disruption depth is what he offers.

Round 7 (220): C/G Dillon Day, Miss State – With Austin Pasztor as edge OL depth, Day could fill the interior OL utility role. He plays with tenacity.

 

Jaguars Current Offensive Depth Chart

 

QB: Blake Bortles

RB: Denard Robinson

WR: Allen Robinson

WR: Marqise Lee

TE: Julius Thomas

TE: Marcedes Lewis

LT: Luke Joeckel

LG: Zane Beadles

C: Luke Bowanko

RG: Brandon Linder

RT: Jermey Parnell

 

Jaguars Current Defensive Depth Chart

 

LE: Jared Odrick

RE: Chris Clemons

DT: Sen’Derrick Marks

NT: Roy Miller

MLB: Paul Posluszny

WLB: Telvin Smith

SLB: Dan Skuta

CB: Davon House

CB: Demetrius McCray

FS: Sergio Brown

SS: Johnathan Cyprien

Evan Silva is a senior football editor for Rotoworld.com. He can be found on Twitter .
Email :Evan Silva

Offseason Low Down: Depth Chart Holes

Written by : Posted on March 29, 2015 : No Comments
This post was originally published on this site

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Free agency filled in a lot of missing pieces on depth charts: Frank Gore as Indy’s No. 1 back, Dwayne Bowe as Cleveland’s top wideout, Julius Thomas as Jacksonville’s red-zone playmaker.

Of course, free agency also created a lot of holes. There are still some decent scraps left on the open market (Stevan Ridley, Rob Housler, Michael Crabtree), but these holes are most likely going to be filled in-house or through the draft. Here are important fantasy opportunities worth monitoring:

1. Dallas No. 1 Running Back
In-house candidates: Joseph Randle, Darren McFadden, Ryan Williams, Lance Dunbar
In the wake of DeMarco Murray’s defection, coach Jason Garrett said the run-first philosophy that was so successful last season will stay intact. “It was a good style of football for us to play. We will continue to try to do that,” he said. The Cowboys’ road-grating offensive line remains in place, but the horse in the backfield does not. Darren McFadden was signed to be a “home-run hitting backup,” underwear thief Joseph Randle is not likely to be the true answer and Ryan Williams has appeared in five NFL games since 2011. Perhaps Todd Gurley, Melvin Gordon or another draft pick will become a Cowboy and take hold of the No. 1 rookie for re-draft spot.

2. Eagles outside Wide Receiver
In-house candidates: Jordan Matthews, Riley Cooper, Josh Huff
The Eagles had a price they wanted to spend on Jeremy Maclin and refused to go over it. So now they’re left with a big hole on the outside, where league-worst starter Riley Cooper and very unproven Josh Huff are penciled in as starters. It’s certainly worth noting that Chip Kelly left open the possibility for rising star Jordan Matthews to play outside some — Matthews ran a league-high 92.4 percent his routes from the slot last year. If he goes outside in “12” formations,” he’ll see both an increase in volume (he only played on 65 percent of the snaps last year) and depth of target. Matthews has WR1 upside in 2015 – even if the Eagles spend a priority draft pick on an outside receiver as they almost certainly will. Regardless of who ends up starting, there’s a lot of opportunity in this fastbreak offense that I believe will get a boost from Sam Bradford’s accuracy.

3. Saints Tight End
In-house candidates: Josh Hill, Ben Watson
Jimmy Graham has averaged 88.7 catches for 1,099 yards and 11.5 touchdowns per season over the last four years. As you can see, the trade that shocked the world left a ton of production behind. Low-upside veteran Ben Watson remains, but the name on the tip of everyone’s tongue right now is athletic 6-5/229 24-year-old Josh Hill. Those tongues include Sean Payton himself: “He’s exactly what we’re looking for. Each week you know exactly what you’re gonna get. He’s talented, he can run, he’s young, he’s consistent. Those are things that allow you to win.” More Payton: “This Josh Hill is another player that I love. I love. When you look at his runs, jumps, height, weight speed, you looking at his measureables… and he didn’t go to the Combine, thank God.” Graham’s role will be filled by a committee that includes C.J. Spiller, Watson, Brandin Cooks, Nick Toon, maybe even Brandon Coleman. But the one Payton is highest on right now is Hill.

4. Falcons No. 1 Running Back
In-house candidates: Devonta Freeman
Steven Jackson slogged his way through two seasons as a Falcon, averaging a pathetic 3.60 YPC. He’s gone and Kyle Shanahan is in as coordinator, creating a really exciting opportunity as Shanny offenses will run the ball successfully. Devonta Freeman doesn’t profile as a typical one-cut back because he doesn’t break tackles physically inside. It showed up in last year’s disappointing 3.81 YPC and failure to ice S-Jax. However, Freeman can pass protect, can catch passes and could improve his running as an NFL sophomore.  We’ll find out how confident the Falcons are based on how high they select a running back in the draft.

5. Ravens No. 1 Wide Receiver
In-house candidates: Steve Smith, Marlon Brown, Kamar Aiken
As a Torrey Smith Dynasty owner, I was licking my chops when Marc Trestman was hired as the Ravens offensive coordinator. My chops then went dry when Torrey bolted for San Francisco, leaving behind only 35-year-old Steve Smith, Marlon Brown and Kamar Aiken. That’s simply not going to cut it for Trestman, whose offenses have ranked in the top-half of the league in pass attempts in all 13 of his seasons. This spot must be addressed via a wideout draft class that is deep and rich with talent once again.

6. Raiders No. 1 Wide Receiver
In-house candidates: James Jones
The Raiders have not had a 1,000-yard receiver since 2005 with Randy Moss. This pathetic streak must end, especially if the franchise is serious about developing promising quarterback prospect David Carr. With no realistic in-house options, the obvious assumption is that they’ll take either West Virginia’s Kevin White or Alabama’s Amari Cooper at No. 4 overall. Oakland would be a decent landing spot for them as Carr ranked seventh in the NFL in pass attempts last year – playing from behind every week yields volume.  

7. Chiefs No. 2 Wide Receiver
In-house candidates: Albert Wilson, Jason Avant, Da’Rick Rogers
Between Weeks 14-16 of last season, 5-foot-9 UDFA Albert Wilson shined with 12 catches for 209 yards. He airballed in Week 17, but backup Chase Daniel started. It was enough to create some serious buzz around Wilson, a slot receiver the team genuinely seems excited about. Now, is he good enough to truly complement new No. 1 Jeremy Maclin? That’s another story. We do know he provides more upside than Andy Reid favorite Jason Avant, arguably the slowest receiver in the NFL. Whoever wins this job will be No. 3 on the target totem pole behind Maclin and Zeus himself (Travis Kelce).   

8. Cardinals power Running Back
In-house candidates: Andre Ellington, Stepfan Taylor
The Cardinals tried to saddle up Andre Ellington as a feature back last season and it backfired. The 199-pounder melted down under the pressure of 20.5 touches per game, losing his trademark explosion en route to a horrific 3.3 YPC. A preseason foot injury and facing the brutal defenses of the NFC West certainly didn’t help, but the Cardinals are now in the market for a big back. If they don’t land Adrian Peterson, power back figures to be a place they’ll look in the draft. Ellington’s fantasy stock is on track to take a major hit in 2015.

9. Chargers No. 1 Running Back
In-house candidates: Branden Oliver, Donald Brown, Danny Woodhead
At this week’s annual spring meeting, the Chargers’ brass expressed confidence they can win with their three in-house backs. It’s not that far-fetched, as Branden Oliver flashed in relief of Ryan Mathews last year, Donald Brown is a reasonable backup and Danny Woodhead is one of the game’s premier passing backs. There have been worse committees trotted out. Still, the Union-Tribune pointed out this week the Chargers need a “game wrecker” on offense. Adrian Peterson was dismissed as too expensive, but a draft pick seems likely. If not, expect a full-blown three-headed monster.  

Free agency filled in a lot of missing pieces on depth charts: Frank Gore as Indy’s No. 1 back, Dwayne Bowe as Cleveland’s top wideout, Julius Thomas as Jacksonville’s red-zone playmaker.

Of course, free agency also created a lot of holes. There are still some decent scraps left on the open market (Stevan Ridley, Rob Housler, Michael Crabtree), but these holes are most likely going to be filled in-house or through the draft. Here are important fantasy opportunities worth monitoring:

1. Dallas No. 1 Running Back
In-house candidates: Joseph Randle, Darren McFadden, Ryan Williams, Lance Dunbar
In the wake of DeMarco Murray’s defection, coach Jason Garrett said the run-first philosophy that was so successful last season will stay intact. “It was a good style of football for us to play. We will continue to try to do that,” he said. The Cowboys’ road-grating offensive line remains in place, but the horse in the backfield does not. Darren McFadden was signed to be a “home-run hitting backup,” underwear thief Joseph Randle is not likely to be the true answer and Ryan Williams has appeared in five NFL games since 2011. Perhaps Todd Gurley, Melvin Gordon or another draft pick will become a Cowboy and take hold of the No. 1 rookie for re-draft spot.

2. Eagles outside Wide Receiver
In-house candidates: Jordan Matthews, Riley Cooper, Josh Huff
The Eagles had a price they wanted to spend on Jeremy Maclin and refused to go over it. So now they’re left with a big hole on the outside, where league-worst starter Riley Cooper and very unproven Josh Huff are penciled in as starters. It’s certainly worth noting that Chip Kelly left open the possibility for rising star Jordan Matthews to play outside some — Matthews ran a league-high 92.4 percent his routes from the slot last year. If he goes outside in “12” formations,” he’ll see both an increase in volume (he only played on 65 percent of the snaps last year) and depth of target. Matthews has WR1 upside in 2015 – even if the Eagles spend a priority draft pick on an outside receiver as they almost certainly will. Regardless of who ends up starting, there’s a lot of opportunity in this fastbreak offense that I believe will get a boost from Sam Bradford’s accuracy.

3. Saints Tight End
In-house candidates: Josh Hill, Ben Watson
Jimmy Graham has averaged 88.7 catches for 1,099 yards and 11.5 touchdowns per season over the last four years. As you can see, the trade that shocked the world left a ton of production behind. Low-upside veteran Ben Watson remains, but the name on the tip of everyone’s tongue right now is athletic 6-5/229 24-year-old Josh Hill. Those tongues include Sean Payton himself: “He’s exactly what we’re looking for. Each week you know exactly what you’re gonna get. He’s talented, he can run, he’s young, he’s consistent. Those are things that allow you to win.” More Payton: “This Josh Hill is another player that I love. I love. When you look at his runs, jumps, height, weight speed, you looking at his measureables… and he didn’t go to the Combine, thank God.” Graham’s role will be filled by a committee that includes C.J. Spiller, Watson, Brandin Cooks, Nick Toon, maybe even Brandon Coleman. But the one Payton is highest on right now is Hill.

4. Falcons No. 1 Running Back
In-house candidates: Devonta Freeman
Steven Jackson slogged his way through two seasons as a Falcon, averaging a pathetic 3.60 YPC. He’s gone and Kyle Shanahan is in as coordinator, creating a really exciting opportunity as Shanny offenses will run the ball successfully. Devonta Freeman doesn’t profile as a typical one-cut back because he doesn’t break tackles physically inside. It showed up in last year’s disappointing 3.81 YPC and failure to ice S-Jax. However, Freeman can pass protect, can catch passes and could improve his running as an NFL sophomore.  We’ll find out how confident the Falcons are based on how high they select a running back in the draft.

5. Ravens No. 1 Wide Receiver
In-house candidates: Steve Smith, Marlon Brown, Kamar Aiken
As a Torrey Smith Dynasty owner, I was licking my chops when Marc Trestman was hired as the Ravens offensive coordinator. My chops then went dry when Torrey bolted for San Francisco, leaving behind only 35-year-old Steve Smith, Marlon Brown and Kamar Aiken. That’s simply not going to cut it for Trestman, whose offenses have ranked in the top-half of the league in pass attempts in all 13 of his seasons. This spot must be addressed via a wideout draft class that is deep and rich with talent once again.

6. Raiders No. 1 Wide Receiver
In-house candidates: James Jones
The Raiders have not had a 1,000-yard receiver since 2005 with Randy Moss. This pathetic streak must end, especially if the franchise is serious about developing promising quarterback prospect David Carr. With no realistic in-house options, the obvious assumption is that they’ll take either West Virginia’s Kevin White or Alabama’s Amari Cooper at No. 4 overall. Oakland would be a decent landing spot for them as Carr ranked seventh in the NFL in pass attempts last year – playing from behind every week yields volume.  

7. Chiefs No. 2 Wide Receiver
In-house candidates: Albert Wilson, Jason Avant, Da’Rick Rogers
Between Weeks 14-16 of last season, 5-foot-9 UDFA Albert Wilson shined with 12 catches for 209 yards. He airballed in Week 17, but backup Chase Daniel started. It was enough to create some serious buzz around Wilson, a slot receiver the team genuinely seems excited about. Now, is he good enough to truly complement new No. 1 Jeremy Maclin? That’s another story. We do know he provides more upside than Andy Reid favorite Jason Avant, arguably the slowest receiver in the NFL. Whoever wins this job will be No. 3 on the target totem pole behind Maclin and Zeus himself (Travis Kelce).   

8. Cardinals power Running Back
In-house candidates: Andre Ellington, Stepfan Taylor
The Cardinals tried to saddle up Andre Ellington as a feature back last season and it backfired. The 199-pounder melted down under the pressure of 20.5 touches per game, losing his trademark explosion en route to a horrific 3.3 YPC. A preseason foot injury and facing the brutal defenses of the NFC West certainly didn’t help, but the Cardinals are now in the market for a big back. If they don’t land Adrian Peterson, power back figures to be a place they’ll look in the draft. Ellington’s fantasy stock is on track to take a major hit in 2015.

9. Chargers No. 1 Running Back
In-house candidates: Branden Oliver, Donald Brown, Danny Woodhead
At this week’s annual spring meeting, the Chargers’ brass expressed confidence they can win with their three in-house backs. It’s not that far-fetched, as Branden Oliver flashed in relief of Ryan Mathews last year, Donald Brown is a reasonable backup and Danny Woodhead is one of the game’s premier passing backs. There have been worse committees trotted out. Still, the Union-Tribune pointed out this week the Chargers need a “game wrecker” on offense. Adrian Peterson was dismissed as too expensive, but a draft pick seems likely. If not, expect a full-blown three-headed monster.  

Adam Levitan is in his sixth season covering football and basketball for Rotoworld. He won the Fantasy Sports Writers Association award for Best Series in 2011 and 2009, and ESPN’s overall fantasy football title in 2000. Find him on Twitter.
Email :Adam Levitan

CERAMICS

Written by : Posted on March 27, 2015 : No Comments

CERAMICS

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Draft Analysis: NFL Draft Needs: Redskins

Written by : Posted on March 26, 2015 : No Comments
This post was originally published on this site

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Evan Silva (@EvanSilva) is the Senior Football Editor for Rotoworld’s NFL Page, and Josh Norris (@JoshNorris) leads Rotoworld’s college football and NFL draft coverage. Together, they’re breaking down every team’s biggest needs and offering potential solutions in May’s draft.

For a breakdown on every team, check out the team-by-team draft preview schedule.

No. 1 Team Need: Offensive line

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

LT Trent Williams and C Kory Lichtensteiger should be Washington’s only established O-Line pieces. 32-year-old RG Chris Chester is an overpaid replacement-level starter, while 2014 third-round pick Morgan Moses showed no signs of fixing the Redskins’ annual right tackle woes before suffering a Lisfranc fracture last December. Spencer Long may be a promising in-house competitor for Chester, but right tackle must be addressed. The Redskins hinted at their concern in free agency, flirting with Bryan Bulaga, Jermey Parnell and Derek Newton. In the post-Shanahan era, coach Jay Gruden has been in the process of adding size up front.

 

No. 2 Team Need: Safety

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

New GM Scot McCloughan may have uncovered a gem in new SS Jeron Johnson, but free safety is a black hole with Trent Robinson and Phillip Thomas wobbling atop the depth chart. Formerly of Seattle and San Francisco’s front offices, McCloughan won’t take safety lightly, as clueless predecessor Bruce Allen did. A Rod Marinelli disciple, new Redskins DC Joe Barry has a Cover 2 background.

 

No. 3 Team Need: Outside linebacker

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

Ryan Kerrigan is an established stud, but is better suited to a No. 2 pass-rusher role, and is entering the last season of his rookie deal. While 2014 second-round pick Trent Murphy excels as an edge-setting run defender, he would ideally come off the field in most passing situations. McCloughan did a nice job of squaring away Washington’s defensive line in free agency. He now needs an outside rusher to build around. Other areas worth addressing in the draft include third-down back and cornerback depth.

Norris’ Mock Draft

Round 1 (5): DL Leonard Williams, USC – Go ahead. Say it. “No way,” right? We love draft weekend for the surprises. Think about it: If the two QBs are the top two picks, Vic Beasley goes to Jacksonville and the Raiders take a receiver, Williams is still on the board at No. 5. Yes the team added Stephen Paea, but I bet he plays the end spot closer to the G/C. Jason Hatcher has been great, but I think Williams is an obviously replacement beyond this year. Some believe Washington will trade down to select a guard, but is Williams worth passing up on?

Round 2 (38): G Laken Tomlinson, Duke – Tomlinson earned money at the Senior Bowl. He displayed an improved anchor to stop his opponent’s momentum as a pass rusher and sealed lanes in the running game.

Round 2 (69): S Derron Smith, Fresno State – Has experience shadowing receivers or working in either safety spot. Obviously teams will have to narrow down what he does best, but in a cloudy safety draft, Smith’s name could emerge earlier than expected.

Round 4 (105): EDGE Nate Orchard, Utah – I know some love Nate Orchard. I do not, but appreciate his motor to win. He plays like Jarvis Jones with a tad more athleticism. But in a rotational role, Orchard is worth the investment.

Round 5 (141): T Austin Shepherd, Alabama – Many teams do like productive players form brand name schools. I’m not sure if Washington will be one of those with new decision makers in place, but Shepherd can compete at the right tackle spot.

Round 6 (182): RB Matt Jones, Florida – A bigger back with agility. Jones’ best skill early on will be in a third down, pass catching role. He is comfortable in space for someone of his size and has a decent pass pro foundation. That is difficult to find. Below average testing could stand out and keep him on the board.

Round 7 (222): TE Nick Boyle, Delaware – Grasping for straws. The Redskins have two “move” pieces in Jordan Reed and Niles Paul. Boyle could be the inline piece and fill a specific role. That is all you can ask for in seventh-round picks.

 

Redskins Current First-Team Offense

 

QB: Robert Griffin III

RB: Alfred Morris

WR: DeSean Jackson

WR: Pierre Garcon

TE: Jordan Reed

TE: Niles Paul

LT: Trent Williams

LG: Shawn Lauvao

C: Kory Lichtensteiger

RG: Chris Chester

RT: Tom Compton

 

Redskins Current First-Team Defense

RE: Jason Hatcher

LE: Stephen Paea

NT: Terrance Knighton

OLB: Ryan Kerrigan

OLB: Trent Murphy

ILB: Perry Riley

ILB: Keenan Robinson

CB: Chris Culliver

CB: Bashaud Breeland

FS: Phillip Thomas

SS: Jeron Johnson

Evan Silva (@EvanSilva) is the Senior Football Editor for Rotoworld’s NFL Page, and Josh Norris (@JoshNorris) leads Rotoworld’s college football and NFL draft coverage. Together, they’re breaking down every team’s biggest needs and offering potential solutions in May’s draft.

For a breakdown on every team, check out the team-by-team draft preview schedule.

No. 1 Team Need: Offensive line

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

LT Trent Williams and C Kory Lichtensteiger should be Washington’s only established O-Line pieces. 32-year-old RG Chris Chester is an overpaid replacement-level starter, while 2014 third-round pick Morgan Moses showed no signs of fixing the Redskins’ annual right tackle woes before suffering a Lisfranc fracture last December. Spencer Long may be a promising in-house competitor for Chester, but right tackle must be addressed. The Redskins hinted at their concern in free agency, flirting with Bryan Bulaga, Jermey Parnell and Derek Newton. In the post-Shanahan era, coach Jay Gruden has been in the process of adding size up front.

 

No. 2 Team Need: Safety

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

New GM Scot McCloughan may have uncovered a gem in new SS Jeron Johnson, but free safety is a black hole with Trent Robinson and Phillip Thomas wobbling atop the depth chart. Formerly of Seattle and San Francisco’s front offices, McCloughan won’t take safety lightly, as clueless predecessor Bruce Allen did. A Rod Marinelli disciple, new Redskins DC Joe Barry has a Cover 2 background.

 

No. 3 Team Need: Outside linebacker

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

Ryan Kerrigan is an established stud, but is better suited to a No. 2 pass-rusher role, and is entering the last season of his rookie deal. While 2014 second-round pick Trent Murphy excels as an edge-setting run defender, he would ideally come off the field in most passing situations. McCloughan did a nice job of squaring away Washington’s defensive line in free agency. He now needs an outside rusher to build around. Other areas worth addressing in the draft include third-down back and cornerback depth.

Norris’ Mock Draft

Round 1 (5): DL Leonard Williams, USC – Go ahead. Say it. “No way,” right? We love draft weekend for the surprises. Think about it: If the two QBs are the top two picks, Vic Beasley goes to Jacksonville and the Raiders take a receiver, Williams is still on the board at No. 5. Yes the team added Stephen Paea, but I bet he plays the end spot closer to the G/C. Jason Hatcher has been great, but I think Williams is an obviously replacement beyond this year. Some believe Washington will trade down to select a guard, but is Williams worth passing up on?

Round 2 (38): G Laken Tomlinson, Duke – Tomlinson earned money at the Senior Bowl. He displayed an improved anchor to stop his opponent’s momentum as a pass rusher and sealed lanes in the running game.

Round 2 (69): S Derron Smith, Fresno State – Has experience shadowing receivers or working in either safety spot. Obviously teams will have to narrow down what he does best, but in a cloudy safety draft, Smith’s name could emerge earlier than expected.

Round 4 (105): EDGE Nate Orchard, Utah – I know some love Nate Orchard. I do not, but appreciate his motor to win. He plays like Jarvis Jones with a tad more athleticism. But in a rotational role, Orchard is worth the investment.

Round 5 (141): T Austin Shepherd, Alabama – Many teams do like productive players form brand name schools. I’m not sure if Washington will be one of those with new decision makers in place, but Shepherd can compete at the right tackle spot.

Round 6 (182): RB Matt Jones, Florida – A bigger back with agility. Jones’ best skill early on will be in a third down, pass catching role. He is comfortable in space for someone of his size and has a decent pass pro foundation. That is difficult to find. Below average testing could stand out and keep him on the board.

Round 7 (222): TE Nick Boyle, Delaware – Grasping for straws. The Redskins have two “move” pieces in Jordan Reed and Niles Paul. Boyle could be the inline piece and fill a specific role. That is all you can ask for in seventh-round picks.

 

Redskins Current First-Team Offense

 

QB: Robert Griffin III

RB: Alfred Morris

WR: DeSean Jackson

WR: Pierre Garcon

TE: Jordan Reed

TE: Niles Paul

LT: Trent Williams

LG: Shawn Lauvao

C: Kory Lichtensteiger

RG: Chris Chester

RT: Tom Compton

 

Redskins Current First-Team Defense

RE: Jason Hatcher

LE: Stephen Paea

NT: Terrance Knighton

OLB: Ryan Kerrigan

OLB: Trent Murphy

ILB: Perry Riley

ILB: Keenan Robinson

CB: Chris Culliver

CB: Bashaud Breeland

FS: Phillip Thomas

SS: Jeron Johnson

Evan Silva is a senior football editor for Rotoworld.com. He can be found on Twitter .
Email :Evan Silva

Draft Analysis: NFL Draft Needs: Redskins

Written by : Posted on March 26, 2015 : No Comments
This post was originally published on this site

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Evan Silva (@EvanSilva) is the Senior Football Editor for Rotoworld’s NFL Page, and Josh Norris (@JoshNorris) leads Rotoworld’s college football and NFL draft coverage. Together, they’re breaking down every team’s biggest needs and offering potential solutions in May’s draft.

For a breakdown on every team, check out the team-by-team draft preview schedule.

No. 1 Team Need: Offensive line

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

LT Trent Williams and C Kory Lichtensteiger should be Washington’s only established O-Line pieces. 32-year-old RG Chris Chester is an overpaid replacement-level starter, while 2014 third-round pick Morgan Moses showed no signs of fixing the Redskins’ annual right tackle woes before suffering a Lisfranc fracture last December. Spencer Long may be a promising in-house competitor for Chester, but right tackle must be addressed. The Redskins hinted at their concern in free agency, flirting with Bryan Bulaga, Jermey Parnell and Derek Newton. In the post-Shanahan era, coach Jay Gruden has been in the process of adding size up front.

 

No. 2 Team Need: Safety

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

New GM Scot McCloughan may have uncovered a gem in new SS Jeron Johnson, but free safety is a black hole with Trent Robinson and Phillip Thomas wobbling atop the depth chart. Formerly of Seattle and San Francisco’s front offices, McCloughan won’t take safety lightly, as clueless predecessor Bruce Allen did. A Rod Marinelli disciple, new Redskins DC Joe Barry has a Cover 2 background.

 

No. 3 Team Need: Outside linebacker

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

Ryan Kerrigan is an established stud, but is better suited to a No. 2 pass-rusher role, and is entering the last season of his rookie deal. While 2014 second-round pick Trent Murphy excels as an edge-setting run defender, he would ideally come off the field in most passing situations. McCloughan did a nice job of squaring away Washington’s defensive line in free agency. He now needs an outside rusher to build around. Other areas worth addressing in the draft include third-down back and cornerback depth.

Norris’ Mock Draft

Round 1 (5): DL Leonard Williams, USC – Go ahead. Say it. “No way,” right? We love draft weekend for the surprises. Think about it: If the two QBs are the top two picks, Vic Beasley goes to Jacksonville and the Raiders take a receiver, Williams is still on the board at No. 5. Yes the team added Stephen Paea, but I bet he plays the end spot closer to the G/C. Jason Hatcher has been great, but I think Williams is an obviously replacement beyond this year. Some believe Washington will trade down to select a guard, but is Williams worth passing up on?

Round 2 (38): G Laken Tomlinson, Duke – Tomlinson earned money at the Senior Bowl. He displayed an improved anchor to stop his opponent’s momentum as a pass rusher and sealed lanes in the running game.

Round 2 (69): S Derron Smith, Fresno State – Has experience shadowing receivers or working in either safety spot. Obviously teams will have to narrow down what he does best, but in a cloudy safety draft, Smith’s name could emerge earlier than expected.

Round 4 (105): EDGE Nate Orchard, Utah – I know some love Nate Orchard. I do not, but appreciate his motor to win. He plays like Jarvis Jones with a tad more athleticism. But in a rotational role, Orchard is worth the investment.

Round 5 (141): T Austin Shepherd, Alabama – Many teams do like productive players form brand name schools. I’m not sure if Washington will be one of those with new decision makers in place, but Shepherd can compete at the right tackle spot.

Round 6 (182): RB Matt Jones, Florida – A bigger back with agility. Jones’ best skill early on will be in a third down, pass catching role. He is comfortable in space for someone of his size and has a decent pass pro foundation. That is difficult to find. Below average testing could stand out and keep him on the board.

Round 7 (222): TE Nick Boyle, Delaware – Grasping for straws. The Redskins have two “move” pieces in Jordan Reed and Niles Paul. Boyle could be the inline piece and fill a specific role. That is all you can ask for in seventh-round picks.

 

Redskins Current First-Team Offense

 

QB: Robert Griffin III

RB: Alfred Morris

WR: DeSean Jackson

WR: Pierre Garcon

TE: Jordan Reed

TE: Niles Paul

LT: Trent Williams

LG: Shawn Lauvao

C: Kory Lichtensteiger

RG: Chris Chester

RT: Tom Compton

 

Redskins Current First-Team Defense

RE: Jason Hatcher

LE: Stephen Paea

NT: Terrance Knighton

OLB: Ryan Kerrigan

OLB: Trent Murphy

ILB: Perry Riley

ILB: Keenan Robinson

CB: Chris Culliver

CB: Bashaud Breeland

FS: Phillip Thomas

SS: Jeron Johnson

Evan Silva (@EvanSilva) is the Senior Football Editor for Rotoworld’s NFL Page, and Josh Norris (@JoshNorris) leads Rotoworld’s college football and NFL draft coverage. Together, they’re breaking down every team’s biggest needs and offering potential solutions in May’s draft.

For a breakdown on every team, check out the team-by-team draft preview schedule.

No. 1 Team Need: Offensive line

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

LT Trent Williams and C Kory Lichtensteiger should be Washington’s only established O-Line pieces. 32-year-old RG Chris Chester is an overpaid replacement-level starter, while 2014 third-round pick Morgan Moses showed no signs of fixing the Redskins’ annual right tackle woes before suffering a Lisfranc fracture last December. Spencer Long may be a promising in-house competitor for Chester, but right tackle must be addressed. The Redskins hinted at their concern in free agency, flirting with Bryan Bulaga, Jermey Parnell and Derek Newton. In the post-Shanahan era, coach Jay Gruden has been in the process of adding size up front.

 

No. 2 Team Need: Safety

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

New GM Scot McCloughan may have uncovered a gem in new SS Jeron Johnson, but free safety is a black hole with Trent Robinson and Phillip Thomas wobbling atop the depth chart. Formerly of Seattle and San Francisco’s front offices, McCloughan won’t take safety lightly, as clueless predecessor Bruce Allen did. A Rod Marinelli disciple, new Redskins DC Joe Barry has a Cover 2 background.

 

No. 3 Team Need: Outside linebacker

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

Ryan Kerrigan is an established stud, but is better suited to a No. 2 pass-rusher role, and is entering the last season of his rookie deal. While 2014 second-round pick Trent Murphy excels as an edge-setting run defender, he would ideally come off the field in most passing situations. McCloughan did a nice job of squaring away Washington’s defensive line in free agency. He now needs an outside rusher to build around. Other areas worth addressing in the draft include third-down back and cornerback depth.

Norris’ Mock Draft

Round 1 (5): DL Leonard Williams, USC – Go ahead. Say it. “No way,” right? We love draft weekend for the surprises. Think about it: If the two QBs are the top two picks, Vic Beasley goes to Jacksonville and the Raiders take a receiver, Williams is still on the board at No. 5. Yes the team added Stephen Paea, but I bet he plays the end spot closer to the G/C. Jason Hatcher has been great, but I think Williams is an obviously replacement beyond this year. Some believe Washington will trade down to select a guard, but is Williams worth passing up on?

Round 2 (38): G Laken Tomlinson, Duke – Tomlinson earned money at the Senior Bowl. He displayed an improved anchor to stop his opponent’s momentum as a pass rusher and sealed lanes in the running game.

Round 2 (69): S Derron Smith, Fresno State – Has experience shadowing receivers or working in either safety spot. Obviously teams will have to narrow down what he does best, but in a cloudy safety draft, Smith’s name could emerge earlier than expected.

Round 4 (105): EDGE Nate Orchard, Utah – I know some love Nate Orchard. I do not, but appreciate his motor to win. He plays like Jarvis Jones with a tad more athleticism. But in a rotational role, Orchard is worth the investment.

Round 5 (141): T Austin Shepherd, Alabama – Many teams do like productive players form brand name schools. I’m not sure if Washington will be one of those with new decision makers in place, but Shepherd can compete at the right tackle spot.

Round 6 (182): RB Matt Jones, Florida – A bigger back with agility. Jones’ best skill early on will be in a third down, pass catching role. He is comfortable in space for someone of his size and has a decent pass pro foundation. That is difficult to find. Below average testing could stand out and keep him on the board.

Round 7 (222): TE Nick Boyle, Delaware – Grasping for straws. The Redskins have two “move” pieces in Jordan Reed and Niles Paul. Boyle could be the inline piece and fill a specific role. That is all you can ask for in seventh-round picks.

 

Redskins Current First-Team Offense

 

QB: Robert Griffin III

RB: Alfred Morris

WR: DeSean Jackson

WR: Pierre Garcon

TE: Jordan Reed

TE: Niles Paul

LT: Trent Williams

LG: Shawn Lauvao

C: Kory Lichtensteiger

RG: Chris Chester

RT: Tom Compton

 

Redskins Current First-Team Defense

RE: Jason Hatcher

LE: Stephen Paea

NT: Terrance Knighton

OLB: Ryan Kerrigan

OLB: Trent Murphy

ILB: Perry Riley

ILB: Keenan Robinson

CB: Chris Culliver

CB: Bashaud Breeland

FS: Phillip Thomas

SS: Jeron Johnson

Evan Silva is a senior football editor for Rotoworld.com. He can be found on Twitter .
Email :Evan Silva