Monthly Archives: April 2015

A brief essay on clinical depression

Written by : Posted on April 29, 2015 : No Comments

A brief essay on clinical depression

The many thoughts, which past some limit we contact ‘depression’, is highly recommended in all of the importance with the the greatest honor. Whether or not it was as easy as informing yourself “Come on! Click out of it” then perhaps it will stop depression symptoms.http://www.valwriting.org/essays-for-sale Depressive moods and levels normally requires various forms and affect folks in different ways. In most cases, it varies from emotion that situations are staying notably tricky at the 1 decisive moment in time, to currently being approximately actually paralysed in sleep for a long time at once. Previously right here we are able to see emerging the idea of stillness .

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Goal Line Stand: Pre-Draft Skill Player Top 12s

Written by : Posted on April 27, 2015 : No Comments
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With free agency long over with and the draft still upcoming, we’ve had a month or so to form 2015 rankings. We’ll dive into this even further in a couple weeks following the draft when we should largely know the main players and their landing spots, but now proved to be a fine time to release some preliminary ranks. Here are my thoughts on the top-12 players — also known as the QB1s, RB1s, WR1s, and TE1s — at the skill-player positions.

Don’t forget, for everything NFL and NFL Draft, check out Rotoworld’s Player News Page, and follow @Rotoworld_FB and @NickMensio on Twitter.

Quarterbacks

1. Aaron Rodgers — The reigning NFL MVP gets the nod over Andrew Luck. He finished third in the league with his 38 touchdowns passes and only tossed five interceptions to go along with the NFL’s second-best YPA mark at 8.4. The Packers were able to lure back Randall Cobb with a four-year, $40 million contract and re-sign RT Bryan Bulaga. Green Bay fields the league’s elite passing offense, and Rodgers is still in his prime at 31 years old.

2. Andrew Luck — Luck had a “career-year” at 25 last season, finishing first in passing touchdowns (40), third in passing yards (4,761), and third in attempts (616). He also did damage as a runner, rushing for 263 yards and three touchdowns. If we weren’t counting interceptions, Luck would’ve ran away as fantasy’s No. 1 quarterback ahead of Aaron Rodgers. OC Pep Hamilton seems to realize he has the best young quarterback in the league running his offense. Luck’s arsenal got better in the offseason with the additions of Andre Johnson and Frank Gore and subtractions of Reggie Wayne, Hakeem Nicks, and Trent Richardson. He and Rodgers will duke it out for the overall QB1 spot.

3. Matt Ryan — No offensive line, no tight end, a broken-down running back, and injuries to Roddy White and Julio Jones torpedoed the Falcons offense last season. The offensive line is still a major question mark, but the hiring of OC Kyle Shanahan should do wonders for that side of the ball. Shanahan was able to coax top-five fantasy seasons out of Robert Griffin III and Matt Schaub at his previous stops. Ryan is a better passer than Schaub was and has better weapons than RGIII had in Washington during his rookie season. Second-year LT Jake Matthews needs to play a lot better for Ryan to make the leap back up from his No. 7 finish last season. But a healthier White and Jones along with improved play at running back and tight end should allow Ryan to improve.

4. Russell Wilson — Wilson had more put on his plate for the third consecutive season and was fantasy’s No. 3 quarterback after tenth- and eighth-place finishes the previous two seasons. His pass attempts should only continue to rise with the Seahawks preparing for life after Marshawn Lynch in the near future. GM John Schneider was able to go out and get Wilson a legitimate red-zone threat and No. 1 receiver in Jimmy Graham after seeing what having a big-bodied pass catcher in Chris Matthews did for Wilson in the Super Bowl. Wilson is a good bet to throw 25-plus touchdowns after tossing just 20 in 2014. He also rushed for 849 yards and six touchdowns last season.

5. Peyton Manning — It was a tale of two seasons for Manning last year; he looked like the 2013 version through the seasons’s first 11 games, posting an incredible 34:9 TD:INT ratio before floundering down the stretch thanks to a torn quad. He managed just five touchdowns to six interceptions the rest of the way and Denver was sent packing after a first-round playoff loss. Manning contemplated retirement, but instead chose to come back and play for new coach Gary Kubiak. It’s expected to be a more balanced offense, but Manning should be healthy and putting up top-five numbers at the position. A top-three finish is certainly doable.

6. Ben Roethlisberger — Big Ben and OC Todd Haley have butted heads at times, but the 33-year-old has been playing fantastic football the past couple years. He’s coming off his best fantasy finish since 2007 thanks to an improved receiving corps and much better offensive line play to go along with a top-two running back in Le’Veon Bell. The Steelers rewarded Roethlisberger with a big contract this offseason, and he’s still in the back end of his prime years. There’s upside with Big Ben.

7. Drew Brees — Brees’ sixth overall finish among fantasy quarterbacks last season was a big-time disappointment. His receiving corps battled injuries (Jimmy Graham and Brandin Cooks) and old age (Marques Colston), while the offensive line struggled to play to its talent level. GM Mickey Loomis blew up the offensive side of the ball, trading away Graham, Kenny Stills, and LG Ben Grubbs and releasing Pierre Thomas. He re-signed Mark Ingram and brought in C.J. Spiller, suggesting the Saints want to become more balanced on offense to keep their rebuilding defense off the field. Brees’ attempts are likely to come down, while his touchdown and big-play numbers will be hit with the losses of Graham and Stills. Brees is a candidate to tumble down the leaderboards again in 2015.

8. Cam Newton — This is lower than I’d like to have Newton. He was a top-five fantasy quarterback each of his first three seasons before plummeting to 17th in 2014. Newton’s health was a big factor; he was coming off offseason ankle surgery before suffering a broken rib last preseason and then getting into a car accident in December that saw him break a couple bones in his back. Newton has week-winning ability. With a full offseason to lick his wounds, a return to the top should be in order. The Panthers really need to figure out how to protect him better and surround him with better players.

9. Tom Brady — Brady and the Patriots got off to a slow start last season that had the football world up in arms wondering if we’d seen the end of their run. Things quickly turned around as New England started romping teams on the way to the playoffs and a Super Bowl title. Brady finished as fantasy’s No. 9 signal caller and compiled a 29:7 TD:INT ratio Weeks 5-16. Entering his age-38 season, Brady hasn’t been able to throw much of a deep ball for a couple years now. But he wins at the intermediate levels and doesn’t turn the ball over. With a healthy Rob Gronkowski at his disposal, Brady has mid-range QB1 upside.

10. Eli Manning — The Giants were a complete mess on offense last preseason, leading many to think Manning could be entering a make-or-break year. When the games counted, however, Manning excelled in OC Ben McAdoo’s West Coast offense. He posted the best completion percentage of his career and now has his most dominant receiver since Plaxico Burress in Odell Beckham. With Victor Cruz set to return from knee surgery, adding him to OBJ, Larry Donnell, Rueben Randle, Shane Vereen, and Rashad Jennings, the Giants have the parts to put up major points. Manning is currently the 12th quarterback coming off the board looking at recent ADP numbers.

11. Matthew Stafford — In his first season under OC Joe Lombardi, Stafford was hurt by Calvin Johnson missing considerable time with an ankle injury, first-rounder Eric Ebron being slow to develop, and Reggie Bush bottoming out due to age and injury. The Lions want to throw the ball less in 2015, but Stafford should remain in the top-10 in attempts. After setting a career-high in completion percentage, a second season under Lombardi could make Stafford a value pick. He has the arm talent to be a top-end QB1. Stafford just needs Megatron to stay healthy.

12. Ryan Tannehill — Tannehill took a big step forward under first-year OC Bill Lazor, rising from fantasy’s No. 16 quarterback in 2013 to No. 8. (Lazor was Nick Foles’ position coach in 2013.) Tannehill threw a career-high 27 touchdowns and ran for 311 yards on the ground, as Lazor designed the offense around his quarterback’s strengths. Tannehill still can’t throw the deep ball and his supporting cast has undergone a massive overhaul, though we’d say it’s improved with Kenny Stills replacing Mike Wallace as the No. 1 receiver. The Dolphins will also get stud LT Branden Albert back from a torn ACL.

Running Backs

1. Le’Veon Bell — Coming out of Michigan State, Bell tipped the scales at 237 pounds. He averaged just 3.5 YPC as a sluggish rookie. The Steelers now list him at 244, but Bell transformed his body and redistributed the weight in 2014 and returned as Pittsburgh’s do-it-all workhorse, finishing the season as fantasy’s No. 2 running back behind DeMarco Murray and his near-historic season. Bell averaged 4.7 YPC as a sophomore and was targeted 100 times in the passing game, second only to Matt Forte. Among running backs with 200-plus carries, Bell was also the only one not to fumble. Bell is only 23, and despite his recently-announced three-game suspension to open the 2015 season, he’d still be my No. 1 overall pick without hesitation. It’s hard to find true workhorse runners, and we’re still going to have Bell for the fantasy playoffs. Bell’s ADP has fallen from 1.01 to 1.04 since his three-game ban was announced on April 9.

2. Jamaal Charles — 2014 wasn’t as kind to Charles after he finished 2013 as fantasy’s No. 1 runner. He missed two games and parts of others due to various lower-body injuries. Charles was also the victim of the Chiefs losing key offensive line members LT Branden Albert, RG Jon Asamoah, and G/T Geoff Schwartz. Additionally, coach Andy Reid scaled back Charles’ involvement in the passing game, as he saw 43 fewer targets. That’s where Charles made his bacon in 2013. He still found pay dirt 14 times last season and remains the clear focal point of the offense despite the addition of new No. 1 receiver Jeremy Maclin and hopeful emergence of TE Travis Kelce. Remember, the Chiefs are still quarterbacked by dink-and-dunk artist Alex Smith. Charles lost another top-flight member of his offensive line in C Rodney Hudson this offseason, but RG Jeff Allen is back healthy and LG Ben Grubbs was acquired via trade from the Saints. Charles is a top-two fantasy pick.

3. Eddie Lacy — A slow start to the season sent Lacy owners into a panic last year, as he failed to top 48 yards in any of the Packers’ first four games and found the end zone just one time. But from Week 5 on, Lacy averaged 5.1 YPC and 81.5 yards per game to go with 12 total touchdowns. There are a ton of mouths to feed in Green Bay, and it starts with Aaron Rodgers, but the return of Randall Cobb to open up the short-to-intermediate levels of the field will only aid Lacy. The re-signing of RT Bryan Bulaga is also big for Lacy and the entire offense. Expect another step forward from soon-to-be 25-year-old Lacy as veterans Marshawn Lynch and Matt Forte face potential declines.

4. Marshawn Lynch — As owners were snatching up Christine Michael in the late rounds of fantasy drafts last summer, Lynch was minding his business behind the scenes readying to prove us all wrong once again on his way to a top-three fantasy finish. Now 29 (last week), Lynch has shown no signs of slowing down. Father Time will win this battle, as he always does, but Beast Mode is a different breed. Last year at this time, there was talk of Lynch possibly entering his final season in Seattle. He went on to run for the second-most yards of his career and set a career-high with 13 rushing touchdowns and 17 all-purpose scores. It landed Lynch a $5 million raise. The offense still goes through Lynch, even if it didn’t on the final play of Super Bowl 49.

5. DeMarco Murray — Murray had never played a full 16-game season before 2014. The Cowboys remade their offense, relying on Murray and a talented run-blocking offensive line. They put it on Murray’s shoulders in the final year of his contract and ran him into the ground, knowing they could move on from the 27-year-old if his body betrayed him. Murray somehow held up to the pounding of 497 total touches and finished as fantasy’s No. 1 running back. A decline is to be expected in his new home of Philadelphia where he’ll no longer he the alpha male. He’s going to a very running back-friendly offense, but will now split reps with Ryan Mathews and Darren Sproles. Chances are greater Murray will disappoint rather than be a value pick in a second-consecutive year, though he’s still a first-round lock.

6. Arian Foster — I was a big believer in Foster heading into last season, and I’m probably a tad higher on him than most again this year. He was up there with DeMarco Murray and Le’Veon Beill in terms of weekly reliability when he was in the lineup last season. And that happened to be 13-of-16 games. Foster finished as fantasy’s No. 5 back and averaged a four-year-best 4.8 YPC on top of 13 all-purpose touchdowns. Turning 29 in August, we can only hope for 1-2 more elite years out of Foster. The Texans return a solid run-blocking offensive line. It’ll be imperative for Foster owners to pair him with Alfred Blue or whomever wins the Texans’ No. 2 running back job.

7. Jeremy Hill — Hill outplayed Giovani Bernard all summer and finally leapfrogged him on the depth chart around midseason. From Week 9 on, Hill led the league in rushing, averaged a robust 5.4 YPC, and was second to only Marshawn Lynch in yards after contact. A violent bruiser, Hill can carry a full load at 6’1/238. The Bengals were able to re-sign LG Clint Boling to bring back one of the league’s top lane-paving offensive lines. OC Hue Jackson showed signs of wanting to put more on Hill’s rookie plate, but refrained at times and it bit the offense in the butt as it relied too heavily on Andy Dalton and Mohamed Sanu. Expect more responsibility for Hill as a sophomore with Bernard playing more in a satellite, pass-catching role. Hill has top-five upside on one of the league’s better teams.

8. Adrian Peterson — A.D. is a hard to figure out at the moment. If everything was rosy and bridges weren’t burned between he and the Vikings, Peterson would be higher in the rankings. But as things stand now, we really don’t know what’s going to happen with Peterson. He wants out of Minnesota, while the Vikings want him to stick around. They’ve dug their feet in in hopes on waiting out the star running back. If Peterson isn’t dealt this week, he’s likely to play for Minnesota or no one in 2015. If the sides can clear the air, Peterson and his fresh 30-year-old legs would have top-three upside in this sneaky offense.

9. Jonathan Stewart — Only DeMarco Murray rushed for more yards over the final five weeks of the season. During that same span, Stewart led the league with his 5.4 YPC mark. This is the Jonathan Stewart we all knew, but he was never able to realize his potential because of injuries. Stewart was able to hold up down the stretch and into the playoffs, giving the Panthers confidence to make the move to release DeAngelo Williams this offseason and hand the keys to Stewart. As long as he’s healthy, Stewart is one of the best runners in the league. He was the main reason the Panthers were able to go 4-1 after their Week 12 bye and sneak into the playoffs. Stewart turned 28 in March and should be a focal point in a balanced offense that would prefer to run the ball more. The concern in Carolina remains a questionable offensive line.

10. C.J. Anderson — Following injuries to Montee Ball and Ronnie Hillman, Anderson took off as Denver’s featured running back. After taking over in Week 10, Anderson averaged 4.7 YPC and 95.8 yards per games the final eight contests. He totaled 10 touchdowns over that span. He’d be higher on the list if not for major changes in Denver. New coach Gary Kubiak is ushering in a revised offense. While it’s expected to feature the running game more, we just don’t know if Anderson will be Kubiak’s guy. (Ball is viewed as a good fit for the zone scheme.) On top of the new offense, the Broncos are undergoing major changes with their offensive line. They could be looking for up to three new starters. Anderson is a dual-threat runner with above-average pass-game skills. If he wins the job, there’s top-five upside here.

11. Matt Forte — Forte was the most consistent player in the Bears’ wrecked offense last season, as he finished as fantasy’s No. 4 running back. There are reasons for concern, however. Forte’s YPC dipped from 4.6 to 3.9 and he’s entering his age-30 season. The loss of coach Marc Trestman can’t be understated for Forte, either. His receiving numbers will take a big hit, and the Bears are likely to look for a big back in the draft to pair with Forte as the offense tries to become more balanced under new coach John Fox. While he’s likely to see more carries under Fox, Forte’s lost production in the passing game can’t be understated. Where he was a top-end RB1 the previous two seasons, Forte is more of a low-end RB1 to possible high-end RB2.

12. LeSean McCoy — Shady followed up his dominant 2013 season where he finished as fantasy’s No. 2 running back with a disappointing 2014. His YPC dipped by nearly a full yard from 5.1 to 4.2. McCoy was caught dancing behind the line too often and was one of the main victims of an injury-riddled offensive line. He also didn’t hammer home his goal-line carries at the same rate as he did in 2013. Coach Chip Kelly deemed east-west-runner McCoy a poor fit for the offense and shipped him up to Buffalo. While the Eagles had Pro Football Focus’ No. 1-ranked run-blocking offensive line last season, the Bills came in dead last at No. 32. They’ve replaced Erik Pears with Richie Incognito, but the line largely remains the same. And the Bills don’t have a first-round pick in this week’s draft. Working in McCoy’s favor is his pairing with run-minded coach Rex Ryan and OC Greg Roman, who annually had one of the league’s top rushing attacks in San Francisco with Frank Gore.

With free agency long over with and the draft still upcoming, we’ve had a month or so to form 2015 rankings. We’ll dive into this even further in a couple weeks following the draft when we should largely know the main players and their landing spots, but now proved to be a fine time to release some preliminary ranks. Here are my thoughts on the top-12 players — also known as the QB1s, RB1s, WR1s, and TE1s — at the skill-player positions.

Don’t forget, for everything NFL and NFL Draft, check out Rotoworld’s Player News Page, and follow @Rotoworld_FB and @NickMensio on Twitter.

Quarterbacks

1. Aaron Rodgers — The reigning NFL MVP gets the nod over Andrew Luck. He finished third in the league with his 38 touchdowns passes and only tossed five interceptions to go along with the NFL’s second-best YPA mark at 8.4. The Packers were able to lure back Randall Cobb with a four-year, $40 million contract and re-sign RT Bryan Bulaga. Green Bay fields the league’s elite passing offense, and Rodgers is still in his prime at 31 years old.

2. Andrew Luck — Luck had a “career-year” at 25 last season, finishing first in passing touchdowns (40), third in passing yards (4,761), and third in attempts (616). He also did damage as a runner, rushing for 263 yards and three touchdowns. If we weren’t counting interceptions, Luck would’ve ran away as fantasy’s No. 1 quarterback ahead of Aaron Rodgers. OC Pep Hamilton seems to realize he has the best young quarterback in the league running his offense. Luck’s arsenal got better in the offseason with the additions of Andre Johnson and Frank Gore and subtractions of Reggie Wayne, Hakeem Nicks, and Trent Richardson. He and Rodgers will duke it out for the overall QB1 spot.

3. Matt Ryan — No offensive line, no tight end, a broken-down running back, and injuries to Roddy White and Julio Jones torpedoed the Falcons offense last season. The offensive line is still a major question mark, but the hiring of OC Kyle Shanahan should do wonders for that side of the ball. Shanahan was able to coax top-five fantasy seasons out of Robert Griffin III and Matt Schaub at his previous stops. Ryan is a better passer than Schaub was and has better weapons than RGIII had in Washington during his rookie season. Second-year LT Jake Matthews needs to play a lot better for Ryan to make the leap back up from his No. 7 finish last season. But a healthier White and Jones along with improved play at running back and tight end should allow Ryan to improve.

4. Russell Wilson — Wilson had more put on his plate for the third consecutive season and was fantasy’s No. 3 quarterback after tenth- and eighth-place finishes the previous two seasons. His pass attempts should only continue to rise with the Seahawks preparing for life after Marshawn Lynch in the near future. GM John Schneider was able to go out and get Wilson a legitimate red-zone threat and No. 1 receiver in Jimmy Graham after seeing what having a big-bodied pass catcher in Chris Matthews did for Wilson in the Super Bowl. Wilson is a good bet to throw 25-plus touchdowns after tossing just 20 in 2014. He also rushed for 849 yards and six touchdowns last season.

5. Peyton Manning — It was a tale of two seasons for Manning last year; he looked like the 2013 version through the seasons’s first 11 games, posting an incredible 34:9 TD:INT ratio before floundering down the stretch thanks to a torn quad. He managed just five touchdowns to six interceptions the rest of the way and Denver was sent packing after a first-round playoff loss. Manning contemplated retirement, but instead chose to come back and play for new coach Gary Kubiak. It’s expected to be a more balanced offense, but Manning should be healthy and putting up top-five numbers at the position. A top-three finish is certainly doable.

6. Ben Roethlisberger — Big Ben and OC Todd Haley have butted heads at times, but the 33-year-old has been playing fantastic football the past couple years. He’s coming off his best fantasy finish since 2007 thanks to an improved receiving corps and much better offensive line play to go along with a top-two running back in Le’Veon Bell. The Steelers rewarded Roethlisberger with a big contract this offseason, and he’s still in the back end of his prime years. There’s upside with Big Ben.

7. Drew Brees — Brees’ sixth overall finish among fantasy quarterbacks last season was a big-time disappointment. His receiving corps battled injuries (Jimmy Graham and Brandin Cooks) and old age (Marques Colston), while the offensive line struggled to play to its talent level. GM Mickey Loomis blew up the offensive side of the ball, trading away Graham, Kenny Stills, and LG Ben Grubbs and releasing Pierre Thomas. He re-signed Mark Ingram and brought in C.J. Spiller, suggesting the Saints want to become more balanced on offense to keep their rebuilding defense off the field. Brees’ attempts are likely to come down, while his touchdown and big-play numbers will be hit with the losses of Graham and Stills. Brees is a candidate to tumble down the leaderboards again in 2015.

8. Cam Newton — This is lower than I’d like to have Newton. He was a top-five fantasy quarterback each of his first three seasons before plummeting to 17th in 2014. Newton’s health was a big factor; he was coming off offseason ankle surgery before suffering a broken rib last preseason and then getting into a car accident in December that saw him break a couple bones in his back. Newton has week-winning ability. With a full offseason to lick his wounds, a return to the top should be in order. The Panthers really need to figure out how to protect him better and surround him with better players.

9. Tom Brady — Brady and the Patriots got off to a slow start last season that had the football world up in arms wondering if we’d seen the end of their run. Things quickly turned around as New England started romping teams on the way to the playoffs and a Super Bowl title. Brady finished as fantasy’s No. 9 signal caller and compiled a 29:7 TD:INT ratio Weeks 5-16. Entering his age-38 season, Brady hasn’t been able to throw much of a deep ball for a couple years now. But he wins at the intermediate levels and doesn’t turn the ball over. With a healthy Rob Gronkowski at his disposal, Brady has mid-range QB1 upside.

10. Eli Manning — The Giants were a complete mess on offense last preseason, leading many to think Manning could be entering a make-or-break year. When the games counted, however, Manning excelled in OC Ben McAdoo’s West Coast offense. He posted the best completion percentage of his career and now has his most dominant receiver since Plaxico Burress in Odell Beckham. With Victor Cruz set to return from knee surgery, adding him to OBJ, Larry Donnell, Rueben Randle, Shane Vereen, and Rashad Jennings, the Giants have the parts to put up major points. Manning is currently the 12th quarterback coming off the board looking at recent ADP numbers.

11. Matthew Stafford — In his first season under OC Joe Lombardi, Stafford was hurt by Calvin Johnson missing considerable time with an ankle injury, first-rounder Eric Ebron being slow to develop, and Reggie Bush bottoming out due to age and injury. The Lions want to throw the ball less in 2015, but Stafford should remain in the top-10 in attempts. After setting a career-high in completion percentage, a second season under Lombardi could make Stafford a value pick. He has the arm talent to be a top-end QB1. Stafford just needs Megatron to stay healthy.

12. Ryan Tannehill — Tannehill took a big step forward under first-year OC Bill Lazor, rising from fantasy’s No. 16 quarterback in 2013 to No. 8. (Lazor was Nick Foles’ position coach in 2013.) Tannehill threw a career-high 27 touchdowns and ran for 311 yards on the ground, as Lazor designed the offense around his quarterback’s strengths. Tannehill still can’t throw the deep ball and his supporting cast has undergone a massive overhaul, though we’d say it’s improved with Kenny Stills replacing Mike Wallace as the No. 1 receiver. The Dolphins will also get stud LT Branden Albert back from a torn ACL.

Running Backs

1. Le’Veon Bell — Coming out of Michigan State, Bell tipped the scales at 237 pounds. He averaged just 3.5 YPC as a sluggish rookie. The Steelers now list him at 244, but Bell transformed his body and redistributed the weight in 2014 and returned as Pittsburgh’s do-it-all workhorse, finishing the season as fantasy’s No. 2 running back behind DeMarco Murray and his near-historic season. Bell averaged 4.7 YPC as a sophomore and was targeted 100 times in the passing game, second only to Matt Forte. Among running backs with 200-plus carries, Bell was also the only one not to fumble. Bell is only 23, and despite his recently-announced three-game suspension to open the 2015 season, he’d still be my No. 1 overall pick without hesitation. It’s hard to find true workhorse runners, and we’re still going to have Bell for the fantasy playoffs. Bell’s ADP has fallen from 1.01 to 1.04 since his three-game ban was announced on April 9.

2. Jamaal Charles — 2014 wasn’t as kind to Charles after he finished 2013 as fantasy’s No. 1 runner. He missed two games and parts of others due to various lower-body injuries. Charles was also the victim of the Chiefs losing key offensive line members LT Branden Albert, RG Jon Asamoah, and G/T Geoff Schwartz. Additionally, coach Andy Reid scaled back Charles’ involvement in the passing game, as he saw 43 fewer targets. That’s where Charles made his bacon in 2013. He still found pay dirt 14 times last season and remains the clear focal point of the offense despite the addition of new No. 1 receiver Jeremy Maclin and hopeful emergence of TE Travis Kelce. Remember, the Chiefs are still quarterbacked by dink-and-dunk artist Alex Smith. Charles lost another top-flight member of his offensive line in C Rodney Hudson this offseason, but RG Jeff Allen is back healthy and LG Ben Grubbs was acquired via trade from the Saints. Charles is a top-two fantasy pick.

3. Eddie Lacy — A slow start to the season sent Lacy owners into a panic last year, as he failed to top 48 yards in any of the Packers’ first four games and found the end zone just one time. But from Week 5 on, Lacy averaged 5.1 YPC and 81.5 yards per game to go with 12 total touchdowns. There are a ton of mouths to feed in Green Bay, and it starts with Aaron Rodgers, but the return of Randall Cobb to open up the short-to-intermediate levels of the field will only aid Lacy. The re-signing of RT Bryan Bulaga is also big for Lacy and the entire offense. Expect another step forward from soon-to-be 25-year-old Lacy as veterans Marshawn Lynch and Matt Forte face potential declines.

4. Marshawn Lynch — As owners were snatching up Christine Michael in the late rounds of fantasy drafts last summer, Lynch was minding his business behind the scenes readying to prove us all wrong once again on his way to a top-three fantasy finish. Now 29 (last week), Lynch has shown no signs of slowing down. Father Time will win this battle, as he always does, but Beast Mode is a different breed. Last year at this time, there was talk of Lynch possibly entering his final season in Seattle. He went on to run for the second-most yards of his career and set a career-high with 13 rushing touchdowns and 17 all-purpose scores. It landed Lynch a $5 million raise. The offense still goes through Lynch, even if it didn’t on the final play of Super Bowl 49.

5. DeMarco Murray — Murray had never played a full 16-game season before 2014. The Cowboys remade their offense, relying on Murray and a talented run-blocking offensive line. They put it on Murray’s shoulders in the final year of his contract and ran him into the ground, knowing they could move on from the 27-year-old if his body betrayed him. Murray somehow held up to the pounding of 497 total touches and finished as fantasy’s No. 1 running back. A decline is to be expected in his new home of Philadelphia where he’ll no longer he the alpha male. He’s going to a very running back-friendly offense, but will now split reps with Ryan Mathews and Darren Sproles. Chances are greater Murray will disappoint rather than be a value pick in a second-consecutive year, though he’s still a first-round lock.

6. Arian Foster — I was a big believer in Foster heading into last season, and I’m probably a tad higher on him than most again this year. He was up there with DeMarco Murray and Le’Veon Beill in terms of weekly reliability when he was in the lineup last season. And that happened to be 13-of-16 games. Foster finished as fantasy’s No. 5 back and averaged a four-year-best 4.8 YPC on top of 13 all-purpose touchdowns. Turning 29 in August, we can only hope for 1-2 more elite years out of Foster. The Texans return a solid run-blocking offensive line. It’ll be imperative for Foster owners to pair him with Alfred Blue or whomever wins the Texans’ No. 2 running back job.

7. Jeremy Hill — Hill outplayed Giovani Bernard all summer and finally leapfrogged him on the depth chart around midseason. From Week 9 on, Hill led the league in rushing, averaged a robust 5.4 YPC, and was second to only Marshawn Lynch in yards after contact. A violent bruiser, Hill can carry a full load at 6’1/238. The Bengals were able to re-sign LG Clint Boling to bring back one of the league’s top lane-paving offensive lines. OC Hue Jackson showed signs of wanting to put more on Hill’s rookie plate, but refrained at times and it bit the offense in the butt as it relied too heavily on Andy Dalton and Mohamed Sanu. Expect more responsibility for Hill as a sophomore with Bernard playing more in a satellite, pass-catching role. Hill has top-five upside on one of the league’s better teams.

8. Adrian Peterson — A.D. is a hard to figure out at the moment. If everything was rosy and bridges weren’t burned between he and the Vikings, Peterson would be higher in the rankings. But as things stand now, we really don’t know what’s going to happen with Peterson. He wants out of Minnesota, while the Vikings want him to stick around. They’ve dug their feet in in hopes on waiting out the star running back. If Peterson isn’t dealt this week, he’s likely to play for Minnesota or no one in 2015. If the sides can clear the air, Peterson and his fresh 30-year-old legs would have top-three upside in this sneaky offense.

9. Jonathan Stewart — Only DeMarco Murray rushed for more yards over the final five weeks of the season. During that same span, Stewart led the league with his 5.4 YPC mark. This is the Jonathan Stewart we all knew, but he was never able to realize his potential because of injuries. Stewart was able to hold up down the stretch and into the playoffs, giving the Panthers confidence to make the move to release DeAngelo Williams this offseason and hand the keys to Stewart. As long as he’s healthy, Stewart is one of the best runners in the league. He was the main reason the Panthers were able to go 4-1 after their Week 12 bye and sneak into the playoffs. Stewart turned 28 in March and should be a focal point in a balanced offense that would prefer to run the ball more. The concern in Carolina remains a questionable offensive line.

10. C.J. Anderson — Following injuries to Montee Ball and Ronnie Hillman, Anderson took off as Denver’s featured running back. After taking over in Week 10, Anderson averaged 4.7 YPC and 95.8 yards per games the final eight contests. He totaled 10 touchdowns over that span. He’d be higher on the list if not for major changes in Denver. New coach Gary Kubiak is ushering in a revised offense. While it’s expected to feature the running game more, we just don’t know if Anderson will be Kubiak’s guy. (Ball is viewed as a good fit for the zone scheme.) On top of the new offense, the Broncos are undergoing major changes with their offensive line. They could be looking for up to three new starters. Anderson is a dual-threat runner with above-average pass-game skills. If he wins the job, there’s top-five upside here.

11. Matt Forte — Forte was the most consistent player in the Bears’ wrecked offense last season, as he finished as fantasy’s No. 4 running back. There are reasons for concern, however. Forte’s YPC dipped from 4.6 to 3.9 and he’s entering his age-30 season. The loss of coach Marc Trestman can’t be understated for Forte, either. His receiving numbers will take a big hit, and the Bears are likely to look for a big back in the draft to pair with Forte as the offense tries to become more balanced under new coach John Fox. While he’s likely to see more carries under Fox, Forte’s lost production in the passing game can’t be understated. Where he was a top-end RB1 the previous two seasons, Forte is more of a low-end RB1 to possible high-end RB2.

12. LeSean McCoy — Shady followed up his dominant 2013 season where he finished as fantasy’s No. 2 running back with a disappointing 2014. His YPC dipped by nearly a full yard from 5.1 to 4.2. McCoy was caught dancing behind the line too often and was one of the main victims of an injury-riddled offensive line. He also didn’t hammer home his goal-line carries at the same rate as he did in 2013. Coach Chip Kelly deemed east-west-runner McCoy a poor fit for the offense and shipped him up to Buffalo. While the Eagles had Pro Football Focus’ No. 1-ranked run-blocking offensive line last season, the Bills came in dead last at No. 32. They’ve replaced Erik Pears with Richie Incognito, but the line largely remains the same. And the Bills don’t have a first-round pick in this week’s draft. Working in McCoy’s favor is his pairing with run-minded coach Rex Ryan and OC Greg Roman, who annually had one of the league’s top rushing attacks in San Francisco with Frank Gore.

Wide Receivers

1. Dez Bryant — Bryant saw his targets dip in 2014 with the Cowboys leaning more on their run game. That led to fewer catches for Bryant, though he proved to be even more dominant than he’d been in previous years. Dez averaged 15.0 YPR and led the league with his 16 receiving touchdowns. He was also a monster after the catch, finishing top-five in broken tackles. With DeMarco Murray now gone, Bryant should be the focal point of Dallas’ offense after being a close 1B to Murray’s 1A. Just 26 and playing on the franchise tag, Bryant is out to make a statement that he should be the league’s highest-paid receiver. A year after finishing as fantasy’s No. 4 wideout, Bryant’s my top dog. His ADP has steadily been on the rise for the past month.

2. Demaryius Thomas — D.T. was another slow starter last season only to catch fire following the Broncos’ Week 4 bye. From that point on, Thomas led the league in receiving yards and was second only to Antonio Brown in catches. Slapped with the franchise tag by Denver, Thomas has irked GM John Elway by not showing up to voluntary workouts. It’ll be a non-issue come training camp. Playing for his next contract in his prime at 27 years old, Thomas will be in the overall WR1 mix this season. New coach Gary Kubiak loves to feed his No. 1 receiver. Thomas dominates post-catch, so Peyton Manning’s declining arm won’t be much of a hindrance. And Demaryius should also see a spike in red-zone usage with Julius Thomas out of the picture. I still prefer Dez Bryant as the first receiver off the board, but the case can easily be made for the Broncos’ top wideout.

3. Antonio Brown — Brown doesn’t have elite size or speed, but he’s simply un-coverable thanks to his quick feet and sharp route-running. Among receivers with at least 100 targets, Brown had the fifth-highest catch rate at 72.5 percent. He led the league in receptions (129) and yards (1,698) and was second in touchdowns (13) on his way to being fantasy’s No. 1 wideout. A model of consistency, Brown has caught at least five passes for 50 yards in every game each of the past two seasons. With Le’Veon Bell suspended the first three games of the 2015 season, Brown’s usage rate will be through the roof. Give him a bump in PPR leagues where Brown is arguably WR1 overall.

4. Julio Jones — Jones quietly finished 2014 as fantasy’s No. 8 receiver. There was a stretch of the season where owners were trying to unload Jones after the Atlanta offensive line was decimated by injuries. It forced Matt Ryan to get rid of the ball quickly and lean on Jones and Roddy White in the short passing game, leading to up-and-down weeks. Julio battled some injuries of his own with his hip and oblique, causing him to miss one game and be limited in others. But he ended up finishing sixth in yards after catch and fifth in broken tackles. New OC Kyle Shanahan has always funneled the offense through his X receiver, which bodes well for Jones, who’s also playing for his next contract. And White is another year older. Jones has the talent to be fantasy’s No. 1 overall receiver. With a likely uptick in targets, he just needs his body to cooperate. If he can stay healthy, 2015 could easily be Jones’ best year yet.

5. Calvin Johnson — Megatron wasn’t anywhere near 100 percent health for much of the first half of last season thanks to an ankle injury that he tried to play on for multiple weeks before finally sitting down and missing three games. He was mostly a decoy Weeks 4 and 5 before resting the next four weeks, including the bye. Johnson still posted a 71-1,077-8 line and dominated at times. While injuries are a real concern, Megatron is still just 30 years old and can dominate at 6’5/236. With many owners chalking Johnson’s 2014 up as the start of a decline, he’s shaping up as a fantasy value pick in the early-to-mid second round.

6. Odell Beckham — OBJ won owners a lot of best-ball leagues last season as a late-round flier who ended the year as fantasy’s No. 5 receiver. He missed all of last summer with a hamstring injury and didn’t play in a single preseason game before finally seeing his first action of the season in Week 5. Beckham took the league by storm, finishing eighth in catches, tenth in yards, and fourth in touchdowns among receivers. It was truly a dominating performance. With OBJ, we tend to come back to his size (5’11/198) and want to dock him. But much like Antonio Brown, Beckham wins with his suddenness and route-running chops to go along with insane ball skills. Victor Cruz’s return from a torn patellar tendon may eat into Beckham’s numbers, but he’s assuredly the No. 1 option in the Giants’ passing game.

7. Jordy Nelson — Nelson is coming off a team-record 1,519 receiving yards in a season where he either topped 80 yards or scored a touchdown in 12-of-16 regular-season games. He was fantasy’s No. 2 wideout to Antonio Brown. If not for being 30 years old (next month) and coming off offseason hip surgery, Nelson might be higher in the ranks. Still, he’s Aaron Rodgers’ No. 1 target in one of the game’s elite passing offenses. He’s a borderline first-round pick.

8. Mike Evans — Evans doesn’t get the attention he deserves after being overshadowed by Odell Beckham in their respective rookie seasons. He’s already an elite jump-ball winner in the red zone and should only get better as a route runner. While playing with a rookie quarterback (likely Jameis Winston) is a concern, things can’t get much worse than they were last year with Josh McCown and Mike Glennon. Evans has already overtaken Vincent Jackson as the Bucs’ No. 1 receiver after scoring 12 touchdowns and finishing as fantasy’s No. 10 receiver in year one.

9. T.Y. Hilton — In 2014, Hilton caught the same amount of balls as he did the previous season, but averaged 16.4 YPR compared to 13.2 the year before. OC Pep Hamilton’s willingness to put more on Andrew Luck’s shoulders contributed greatly to Hilton’s improved numbers. Now that Hamilton realizes he has the game’s elite young quarterback, this passing game can grow even more. The additions of Frank Gore and Andre Johnson should only open up more room for Hilton, with Johnson and youngster Donte Moncrief drawing more of the defense’s attention than run-down veterans Reggie Wayne and Hakeem Nicks did last season.

10. Alshon Jeffery — The entire Chicago offense was a mess last season, and Jeffery was just one of many victims. He still finished as fantasy’s No. 11 receiver and scored ten touchdowns, taking over as the Bears’ No. 1 wideout. With Brandon Marshall now gone, Jeffery is cemented atop the depth chart. It’ll be hard for Jay Cutler to be worse than he was in 2014 again this season. The Bears will likely try to run it more under new coach John Fox, but OC Adam Gase is a creative mind who will have no problem finding ways to get the ball to Jeffery. He’s an elite downfield threat with a gunslinger as his quarterback. Jeffery’s going to be peppered with targets on a weekly basis.

11. A.J. Green — Soon-to-be 27-year-old Green’s 2014 season was blemished by toe and bicep injuries that led to a 23rd-place finish among receivers. He missed three games and parts of others. I’m probably a lot lower on Green than most, but I see the impending returns of Marvin Jones and Tyler Eifert from injuries, as well as the Bengals’ likely desire to put more on Jeremy Hill’s plate and take it off Andy Dalton’s. Prior to last season, Green had missed just one game in his career.

12. DeAndre Hopkins — Hopkins took major strides as a sophomore, finishing 12th in the league with his 1,210 receiving yards and averaging an impressive 15.9 YPR. He won’t turn 23 until this summer and gone is veteran Andre Johnson, freeing up 142 targets to be distributed between Hopkins and newcomers Cecil Shorts and Nate Washington. The Texans are also likely to add a receiver early in the draft. But Hopkins is coach Bill O’Brien’s unquestioned No. 1 receiver and he’s only getting better. Hopkins should see close to 10 targets per game after sitting at 7.9 in 2014. He has top-10 upside.

Tight Ends

1. Rob Gronkowski — Those that were able to secure Gronkowski at his third-round ADP last season likely collected cash at the end of the year as their league’s fantasy champion. Gronkowski was coming off a 2013 torn ACL and a 2012 forearm injury that resulted in a couple setbacks and relaxed ADP. The Patriots brought Gronkowski along slowly at the start of last season snaps-wise, but he was still visiting the end zone on near-weekly basis, finishing with a total of 12 scores in the regular season. All he did in the playoffs was post a 16-204-3 line and catch a touchdown in every game. He outscored No. 2 fantasy tight end Antonio Gates by more than two fantasy points per game. A red-zone dominator and Tom Brady hands-down No. 1 target, Gronkowski is in the conversation for fantasy’s top pick and locked in as a first-rounder.

2. Jimmy Graham — Trying to play through a shoulder injury, Graham was not the same player in 2014. He finished third in scoring among tight ends and posted his fewest receiving yards since his 2010 rookie season. Going from the Saints’ pass-heavy offense to the Seahawks’ run-centric one doesn’t help, but improved health, more red-zone chances, and top-end box-out ability keep Graham in the No. 2 spot, even if he’s no longer in the conversation with Rob Gronkowski as overall TE1.

3. Travis Kelce — Kelce was a popular breakout candidate last year but never was able to realize his potential with the Chiefs limiting his snaps and Alex Smith throwing him the football. He was still able to finish as fantasy’s No. 8 tight end despite all the roadblocks. With Anthony Fasano now in Tennessee, Kelce should be locked in as an every-down player. Still, Kelce will be no higher than the No. 2 or 3 option in the passing game behind Jeremy Maclin and possibly Jamaal Charles. Overcoming Smith’s deficiencies will be an even bigger task. Kelce has a Rob Gronkowski-level skill set and caught a tight end-best 82.7 percent of his targets in 2014 all while knocking the rust off from offseason microfracture surgery.

4. Greg Olsen — Olsen has reeled in at least 69 balls each of the past three seasons and is coming off a career-year in which he caught 84 passes for 1,008 yards and six touchdowns, finishing as fantasy’s No. 4 tight end. To this point, the Panthers still have yet to address their hole at No. 2 receiver, leaving Olsen to fend with Kelvin Benjamin for Cam Newton’s targets. 30-year-old Olsen should have a couple above-average seasons left in him.

5. Martellus Bennett — The “Black Unicorn” quietly led all tight ends with his 125 targets last season. It’s worth noting, however, that those targets were a bit ballooned by Brandon Marshall and Alshon Jeffery missing time with injuries. But with Marshall now out of town, Bennett sits in as the No. 2 option in the passing game behind Jeffery and ahead of Matt Forte and Eddie Royal. Bennett is still just 28 and has proven to be a reliable red-zone threat.

6. Julius Thomas — Orange Julius came out of the gates hot in his contract year, scoring 12 touchdowns over the first nine games. He cooled off considerably the remainder of the year, as he was hit by an ankle injury that severely limited his snaps. Thomas didn’t score again and wasn’t re-signed by the Broncos. Thomas was a big “loser” of free agency, leaving Peyton Manning for Blake Bortles. He’ll remain a top option in the red area, but the Jaguars need to get there for him to score. Six-to-eight touchdowns seems more likely for Thomas in Jacksonville.

7. Antonio Gates — Only Rob Gronkowski outscored Gates among tight ends last season. The 34-year-old finished fifth in catches, seventh in receiving yards, and tied for first in touchdowns. Gates has been undervalued each of the past couple seasons, and his age is bound to catch up to him, but mid-range TE1 numbers should be achievable. Even if Gates’ snaps are reduced a bit, he’s going to be a fixture in the red zone and should score 8-10 touchdowns.

8. Zach Ertz — Ertz played just over 50 percent of the snaps as a sophomore after being in on around 40 percent of the plays as a rookie. One encouraging sign, however, was that he played 122-of-169 snaps (72.1 percent) Weeks 16 and 17. The Eagles lost Jeremy Maclin in free agency, freeing up 140 targets and a ton of pass-game opportunities. More receiver than blocker, Ertz and Jordan Matthews are prime breakout candidates. Ertz could easily post top-three numbers at his position.

9. Jordan Cameron — Cameron was a summer darling last year before injuries and horrid quarterback play derailed yet another of his seasons. He just hasn’t been able to stay off the trainer’s table for a full season and has a concerning concussion history. Cameron landing in Miami has piqued our interest. He’ll run most of his routes down the seams and over the middle of the field, and that’s where Ryan Tannehill throws his best balls. If Cameron’s health cooperates — a big “if” — he’s a potential value pick currently being taken in the eighth round of drafts.

10. Coby Fleener — Fleener finally flashed some of the ability that made him a second-round pick. He still plays softer than you’d like out of a tight end, but Fleener can run and catch the ball down the seams, even if he’s prone to a bad drop here and there. Whereas teammate Dwayne Allen made all of his hay as a touchdown-catcher in the red zone, Fleener is targeted heavily in all areas of the field, making him the preferred fantasy option. With the Colts’ base offense featuring one running back and two tight ends, Fleener is basically a full-time player.

11. Kyle Rudolph — We’ve long been fond of Rudolph. But to this point, health hasn’t been on his side. Rudolph battled groin, knee, and ankle problems last season under first-year OC Norv Turner. He’s still just 25 and Turner’s scheme has historically been tight end-friendly. Teddy Bridgewater excels in the middle parts of the field where Rudolph operates. If Rudolph can just stay healthy, there’s a ton of upside here. Like much of the back-end TE1 group, owners can’t rely solely on Rudolph, but he does make for a fine mid-to-late-round pick who has upside.

12. Delanie Walker — Walker led the Titans in targets last season, and Tennessee has done little-to-nothing to improve its pass-game weapons, adding only Harry Douglas and Hakeem Nicks while subtracting Nate Washington. Walker is a highly-athletic do-it-all tight end who excels in the middle of the field. Coach Ken Whisenhunt runs a tight end-friendly offense, making Walker a fine TE1. If Zach Mettenberger remains the quarterback, improved accuracy would go a long way for Walker.

NFL Draft Preview: NFL Draft Cheatsheet: RBs

Written by : Posted on April 27, 2015 : No Comments
This post was originally published on this site

NFL draft season is an exciting time filled with Draft Breakdown cut-ups, egocentric twitter wars and ridiculous anonymous “scout” quotes. There are very few things I love more.

Despite the glory that is draft season, it is difficult at times to wade through the oceans of scouting reports to find the pearls of useful fantasy information. To that end, I have created this NFL Draft Cheat Sheet to answer every important question about the running backs who will hear their named called during the draft.

Who is the best?

This is the deepest draft class in recent memory. There are at least seven running backs I can see as solid starters in the NFL, and there are a few more that have the potential to be big-time contributors. There is one player that is clearly head-and-shoulders above the rest, however, and that is Georgia RB Todd Gurley.

Gurley is a prototype with all the assets teams are looking for in a foundational running back. He is a big, powerful back that can wear down defenses and punish them in the fourth quarter. He effortlessly runs through arm tackles, consistently pushes the pile after contact and defensive backs legitimately look scared to tackle him in the open field. In addition to the power, Gurley has the quick feet and agility to defeat penetration in the backfield and the burst do destroy pursuit angles at the corner. If he gets into the open field, Gurley has the speed to take it all the way to the house.  

It is not all roses for Gurley. He is a high-cut runner that needs to be more consistent running behind his pads, and he can be impatient at times, running into the back of the line instead of waiting for his blocks to develop. There is also the injury history. He missed three games with an ankle injury in 2013 and tore his ACL last season. The injury history is not great, but the only real concern would be if the ACL injury saps some of his quickness or speed. ACL injuries are simply not the scares they were in the past, and his knee gives me zero pause.

Gurley is the best running back prospect since Adrian Peterson, and if not for the ACL tear which could delay the start of his career, he would be a consensus top-ten selection. I am usually against taking running backs with the top overall pick in Dynasty rookie drafts, but for Gurley I may make an exception. He is that good.

Wisconsin RB Melvin Gordon is the other name that occasionally gets put on top of the running back rankings. Gordon unquestionably has an interesting skill set that will likely prove successful in the NFL, but he is well behind Gurley in my eyes.

The most stunning asset Gordon possesses is his burst. When he decides to put his foot down and go, he hits hit top speed very quickly and has the juice to take it all the way to the house. The problem is Gordon can be hesitant at the line, especially on inside runs, and was tackled behind the line of scrimmage way too often. Those stuff plays could also be a function of power, which could at best be described as average. Gordon’s acceleration allows him to burst through arm tackles, but he will very rarely break a squared up tackle.

Gordon was a non-factor in the passing game until last season but did show some improvement in that area. He will never be a natural pass catcher who can be utilized down the field, but he has the skills in the open field to be very useful in the screen and short-passing game. He is also a willing if not skillful blocker who usually goes for the kill shot instead of squaring up his man, giving a punch and sustaining the block.

Like most backs, Gordon is not the finished product and will have a lot of work to do once he reaches the NFL, especially in the passing game. He does have some elite physical traits, and those should allow him to have a solid to very good NFL career. He is the second best running back in this draft but lags well behind Gurley.

Don’t forget, for everything NFL, check out Rotoworld’s Player News and follow @Rotoworld_FB and @RMSummerlin on Twitter.

Who will contribute most as a fantasy player year one?

Landing spot is obviously the most important factor when answering this question, but prior to the draft my money is on Miami RB Duke Johnson.

Duke does a lot of things well, but one of the most impressive parts of his game is his ability as a receiver. His burst and movement skills allow him to create good separation on even intermediate routes, and Johnson has receiver’s hands and the ability to track the ball over the shoulder downfield. If he falls in the correct situation – hello Chan Gailey – he could make an instant impact in the receiving game.

Like Gordon, Johnson’s best trait as a runner is his acceleration. He goes from zero to oh my as quickly as anyone in this draft class, and matched with his decisive style that acceleration makes him a great fit for a one-cut running scheme. Despite his small stature, Johnson is a tough back that uses his burst and lateral agility to defeat angles and break tackles. If a defender gets him squared up, Johnson is going down, but he does a great job of avoiding that squared hit. He is not a pile mover by any stretch and will go down too easily at times, but he is at least functional between the tackles.  

The real question for Johnson’s long-term fantasy value will be how the coaching staff views him. He may be shoehorned into a C.J. Spiller or Gio Bernard role that would severely limit his upside. Johnson can be more than that, and he could be a good value at the top of the second round in Dynasty rookie drafts.

Who has the most upside?

Outside of the top two backs, the player with the most upside is Boise St. RB Jay Ajayi. An aggressive 6-foot, 221 pound runner with a great combination of size and speed, Ajayi is probably the most prototypical back in this class outside Todd Gurley.

The most impressive part of Ajayi’s game is his movement skills, which rival most of the smaller backs in this draft class. He has quick and light feet that allow him to change direction easily and link multiple moves together in the open field. Though he is not a powerful runner, Ajayi has elite balance and the ability to bounce off indirect hits and keep moving forward. An improving receiver out of the backfield, Ajayi was used much more in the passing game last season, and if he can improve his often lackadaisical pass protection style, he could be a three-down-type back.

Ajayi can be an impatient runner and does have a penchant for bouncing runs outside, but he had a couple runs in the bowl game against Arizona that showed nice inside vision and patience to let his blocks develop. He is also a bit lean in the lower body and tends to go down more easily than expected considering his size. Finally, he had serious ball security issues his senior year and will have to clean that area of his game up before he is trusted as a featured back in the NFL.

The biggest issue affecting Ajayi’s draft stock is not anything he does on the field. “Several executives” have “removed him from consideration or backed way off because of how their medical staff evaluated his knee.” Ajayi tore his ACL in 2011, and there appears to be some concern he could need microfracture surgery in the future. These reports could simply be the noise we always hear leading into the draft, but if Ajayi takes a big tumble, his medicals will likely be the culprit.

If his medicals check out, Ajayi has the profile of a foundational runner at the next level. Completely healthy he is probably the third-best back in this draft, and the shelf life for running backs is so small even two or three good years from Ajayi would be enough to return value if he begins to slip into the early second round of rookie drafts.

NFL draft season is an exciting time filled with Draft Breakdown cut-ups, egocentric twitter wars and ridiculous anonymous “scout” quotes. There are very few things I love more.

Despite the glory that is draft season, it is difficult at times to wade through the oceans of scouting reports to find the pearls of useful fantasy information. To that end, I have created this NFL Draft Cheat Sheet to answer every important question about the running backs who will hear their named called during the draft.

Who is the best?

This is the deepest draft class in recent memory. There are at least seven running backs I can see as solid starters in the NFL, and there are a few more that have the potential to be big-time contributors. There is one player that is clearly head-and-shoulders above the rest, however, and that is Georgia RB Todd Gurley.

Gurley is a prototype with all the assets teams are looking for in a foundational running back. He is a big, powerful back that can wear down defenses and punish them in the fourth quarter. He effortlessly runs through arm tackles, consistently pushes the pile after contact and defensive backs legitimately look scared to tackle him in the open field. In addition to the power, Gurley has the quick feet and agility to defeat penetration in the backfield and the burst do destroy pursuit angles at the corner. If he gets into the open field, Gurley has the speed to take it all the way to the house.  

It is not all roses for Gurley. He is a high-cut runner that needs to be more consistent running behind his pads, and he can be impatient at times, running into the back of the line instead of waiting for his blocks to develop. There is also the injury history. He missed three games with an ankle injury in 2013 and tore his ACL last season. The injury history is not great, but the only real concern would be if the ACL injury saps some of his quickness or speed. ACL injuries are simply not the scares they were in the past, and his knee gives me zero pause.

Gurley is the best running back prospect since Adrian Peterson, and if not for the ACL tear which could delay the start of his career, he would be a consensus top-ten selection. I am usually against taking running backs with the top overall pick in Dynasty rookie drafts, but for Gurley I may make an exception. He is that good.

Wisconsin RB Melvin Gordon is the other name that occasionally gets put on top of the running back rankings. Gordon unquestionably has an interesting skill set that will likely prove successful in the NFL, but he is well behind Gurley in my eyes.

The most stunning asset Gordon possesses is his burst. When he decides to put his foot down and go, he hits hit top speed very quickly and has the juice to take it all the way to the house. The problem is Gordon can be hesitant at the line, especially on inside runs, and was tackled behind the line of scrimmage way too often. Those stuff plays could also be a function of power, which could at best be described as average. Gordon’s acceleration allows him to burst through arm tackles, but he will very rarely break a squared up tackle.

Gordon was a non-factor in the passing game until last season but did show some improvement in that area. He will never be a natural pass catcher who can be utilized down the field, but he has the skills in the open field to be very useful in the screen and short-passing game. He is also a willing if not skillful blocker who usually goes for the kill shot instead of squaring up his man, giving a punch and sustaining the block.

Like most backs, Gordon is not the finished product and will have a lot of work to do once he reaches the NFL, especially in the passing game. He does have some elite physical traits, and those should allow him to have a solid to very good NFL career. He is the second best running back in this draft but lags well behind Gurley.

Don’t forget, for everything NFL, check out Rotoworld’s Player News and follow @Rotoworld_FB and @RMSummerlin on Twitter.

Who will contribute most as a fantasy player year one?

Landing spot is obviously the most important factor when answering this question, but prior to the draft my money is on Miami RB Duke Johnson.

Duke does a lot of things well, but one of the most impressive parts of his game is his ability as a receiver. His burst and movement skills allow him to create good separation on even intermediate routes, and Johnson has receiver’s hands and the ability to track the ball over the shoulder downfield. If he falls in the correct situation – hello Chan Gailey – he could make an instant impact in the receiving game.

Like Gordon, Johnson’s best trait as a runner is his acceleration. He goes from zero to oh my as quickly as anyone in this draft class, and matched with his decisive style that acceleration makes him a great fit for a one-cut running scheme. Despite his small stature, Johnson is a tough back that uses his burst and lateral agility to defeat angles and break tackles. If a defender gets him squared up, Johnson is going down, but he does a great job of avoiding that squared hit. He is not a pile mover by any stretch and will go down too easily at times, but he is at least functional between the tackles.  

The real question for Johnson’s long-term fantasy value will be how the coaching staff views him. He may be shoehorned into a C.J. Spiller or Gio Bernard role that would severely limit his upside. Johnson can be more than that, and he could be a good value at the top of the second round in Dynasty rookie drafts.

Who has the most upside?

Outside of the top two backs, the player with the most upside is Boise St. RB Jay Ajayi. An aggressive 6-foot, 221 pound runner with a great combination of size and speed, Ajayi is probably the most prototypical back in this class outside Todd Gurley.

The most impressive part of Ajayi’s game is his movement skills, which rival most of the smaller backs in this draft class. He has quick and light feet that allow him to change direction easily and link multiple moves together in the open field. Though he is not a powerful runner, Ajayi has elite balance and the ability to bounce off indirect hits and keep moving forward. An improving receiver out of the backfield, Ajayi was used much more in the passing game last season, and if he can improve his often lackadaisical pass protection style, he could be a three-down-type back.

Ajayi can be an impatient runner and does have a penchant for bouncing runs outside, but he had a couple runs in the bowl game against Arizona that showed nice inside vision and patience to let his blocks develop. He is also a bit lean in the lower body and tends to go down more easily than expected considering his size. Finally, he had serious ball security issues his senior year and will have to clean that area of his game up before he is trusted as a featured back in the NFL.

The biggest issue affecting Ajayi’s draft stock is not anything he does on the field. “Several executives” have “removed him from consideration or backed way off because of how their medical staff evaluated his knee.” Ajayi tore his ACL in 2011, and there appears to be some concern he could need microfracture surgery in the future. These reports could simply be the noise we always hear leading into the draft, but if Ajayi takes a big tumble, his medicals will likely be the culprit.

If his medicals check out, Ajayi has the profile of a foundational runner at the next level. Completely healthy he is probably the third-best back in this draft, and the shelf life for running backs is so small even two or three good years from Ajayi would be enough to return value if he begins to slip into the early second round of rookie drafts.

Who has the highest floor?

This draft has a lot of backs I expect to have good careers, but in the normal constructs of the “floor/ceiling” discussion, Alabama RB T.J. Yeldon and Minnesota RB David Cobb fit the bill as high-floor players.

Yeldon has the higher floor of the two. Despite his somewhat limited physical skills overall, Yeldon is able to create yards with his patient and refined running style. He does an excellent job setting up his blocks and has decent burst once he decides to put his foot in the ground and go. He also has great foot quickness that allows him to pick his way through traffic inside the tackles.

Despite those great traits, Yeldon is not a burner that will be able to threaten the corner at the next level, and despite his decent size he is not a player that will consistently break tackles or push the pile. Even so, Yeldon has the running instincts to be an above-average runner in the NFL, and I would be surprised if he did not have a long career.

Cobb is a bit riskier than Yeldon because I do not think Cobb knows what kind of back he wants to be. A big runner with middling speed but good burst and lateral agility for his size, Cobb seems much more likely to try to avoid players in the open field rather than using his size and power to create extra yards. It is not that Cobb is afraid of contact, and he does a good job of breaking first contact near the line of scrimmage. It is more he trusts his ability to make people miss in the open field, and as a result he plays much more like a small back than you would expect from an almost 230-pound player.

I saw similar things from Le’Veon Bell at Michigan State, and he eventually remedied the problem by losing a lot of weight, gaining a bit of burst and turning into a more explosive running back. I am not sure Cobb will take the same route, but there is at least a chance he could change his body and turn into a more explosive player. Even if he does not, Cobb has good enough physical traits and instincts as a runner to be a solid starter in the league. Add in his ability as a receiver, and there is a chance he can land a job as a three-down workhorse somewhere.

Don’t forget, for everything NFL, check out Rotoworld’s Player News and follow @Rotoworld_FB and @RMSummerlin on Twitter.

Who is the most overrated?

Normally I hesitate at this question. Every player that is being considered in the NFL Draft has traits that make them interesting, and that makes this question one that I can get wrong in a big way. This year, though, I have no reservations saying Indiana RB Tevin Coleman is the most overrated running back in this class.

Coleman is a classic one-skill player. He is extremely fast in a straight line, and being extremely fast in a straight line allowed him to rack up a ton of huge runs in college. That was college, though, and the open spaces Coleman likes to run fast in are much harder to find in the NFL. Chris Johnson, one of the best big-play backs in recent memory, has only managed 19 runs of 40-plus yards his entire career to this point, and Johnson has much better quickness and change-of-direction skills than Coleman.

It is safe to say Coleman will not be ripping off 40-yard touchdown runs, which made up 27% of his collegiate yard production, on a regular basis in the NFL.  That means he will have to be a more consistent carry-to-carry runner to hold onto any type of workload. Since he struggles to create yards on his own, the only way he is more consistent in the pros is if he lands in a great line situation like Dallas. If he lands in a place with a middling to poor offensive line, he will struggle regardless of the workload.

UNI RB David Johnson is also being overrated by the draft community, but certainly not the extent of Coleman. Johnson does have some interesting traits. He is a very good receiver out of the backfield that creates mismatches against linebackers. He also has nice buildup speed and can be a load to bring down once he gets moving in the open field.

The problem is Johnson does not appear to have very good instincts as a runner and does not appear to be comfortable with contact. That is not a great combination in a running back. Likely better suited to an H-back role in the NFL, Johnson is unlikely to hold much fantasy value in the years to come.

Who is the most underrated?

Nebraska RB Ameer Abdullah is widely viewed as a top running back in this class, so having him in the underrated bin may seem a bit odd. The reason I place him here, though, is I feel he may be undervalued in fantasy circles.  At just 5’9, 205, some people view Abdullah as a perimeter player that will fill a niche role in the NFL, which would limit his fantasy value. There are two things to remember before making that assumption.

First, it is not necessarily a great thing for running backs to be tall. A lot of tall backs are unable to play with a low-enough pad level to avoid big hits and consistently deliver power. If given the choice, I would rather a running back that is 5’10 than one who is 6’2. Second, the idea of a “workhorse” back is an antiquated one. Only 13 backs averaged more than 15 carries a game last season, and only three had enough carries per game to hit 300 over a full slate. Even if running backs stayed healthy for a full season consistently, there would be very few 300-carry backs.

Abdullah’s weight is way more important than his height, and while 205 is not big by running back standards, on Abdullah’s frame it is not dramatically slight. More importantly, Abdullah is a tough and aggressive runner that fights for yards on inside runs. He is not a pile mover by any stretch, but much like Duke Johnson he is able to create yards after contact through agility, balance and pure effort. He fails to beat first contact enough to make his living inside the tackles, but it is not like he will never be asked to run inside.

The one aspect of the game Abdullah’s size will matter is as a pass blocker, and that is the real concern for him turning into a traditional “three-down” back. The reality is few of those exist anymore anyway, and an explosive 12-to-15 touches in a Gio Bernard-like role is valuable in fantasy. I could see Abdullah carving out that role early in his career. That said he is still behind Gurley, Gordon, Johnson, Ajayi, Yeldon and Cobb on my board.

Texas RB Malcolm Brown is a player much further down the list that is being undervalued. After coming to Texas as a highly-touted recruit, Brown struggled while the program crumbled around him under Mack Brown and could not find his footing in one year with Charlie Strong. After being so highly thought of coming out of high school, his underwhelming career has people sleeping on the talent.

Brown is not a dynamic runner that will wow anyone with speed, but that is not the only way to succeed. Brown is a tough, downhill runner that gains yards after contact and knows how to finish runs. He is not shifty, but he does have enough wiggle to avoid penetration, and he had enough burst to get the corner on designed outside runs in college.  

I see Brown as Stevan Ridley type who will be a much better in the NFL than in college. He could make a very similar impact to Ridley early in his career if he lands in a good situation, and he can be had for a song in Dynasty drafts. He will be a big-time target in my rookie drafts this summer.

What small school prospects have big potential?

This is not a great year for small-school running backs, but my favorite by far is South Dakota St. RB Zach Zenner. Zenner is a classic one-cut runner with good burst through the hole and decent long speed despite a poor showing at the combine. He will not make many people miss, but Zenner has the power and balance to run through arm tackles with ease. He is also a plus pass catcher and does good work in pass protection as well.

Zenner will need to find the right system, but in a primarily zone blocking scheme he could do serious damage. Depending on landing spot, he will be a great value in the later rounds of Dynasty drafts this summer.

A player getting a lot of buzz because of his huge production as a collegiate player is Azusa Pacific RB Terrell Watson, but I am not really on board. Standing 6’2, 240, Watson has decent speed and agility for a big man, and his potential as a power-speed hybrid is very interesting.

The problem is Watson was able to get away with a lot of things in college that simply will not fly in the pros. Playing against much smaller competition, it was not an issue Watson ran with terrible pad level, but he will not be able to break as many tackles and deliver his potential power as effectively against NFL defenders. Because he played against slower competition, Watson tends to bounce runs to the outside almost immediately instead of patiently waiting for his block to develop. He has decent speed for a big man, but he will struggle to get the corner consistently at the next level, and he certainly will not be able to defeat pursuit angles like he did in college.

Watson has an interesting physical profile and an excellent history of production on his side, but he will be a work in progress in the NFL. Keep an eye on him if he falls in a rookie draft, but I imagine the hype will be too high this draft season.

Bold Prediction

Duke Johnson is drafted by the Jets and leads the team in running back touches next season. That is right. I am calling both the player’s destination and workload. There is zero chance this works out.

If Johnson does end up in New York, there is a decent chance he could find himself in a C.J. Spiller-like role in Chan Gailey’s offense. He would thrive in that situation, and I would love the fit if it happens. I would also love Johnson’s fit in Detroit. To be honest, I may just love Duke. 

Old Stories

Written by : Posted on April 27, 2015 : No Comments

Old Stories

Traditional fiction is one of the most ancient types of literature. A number of freelance writers from Babylonia and historical Greece and Rome, willingly narrated the stories in their national characters. A lot of these historical bank account get by in this working day.assignment writing service The primary novels contemporary site visitors discover as classics – Shakespeare’s Hamlet and Homer’s Odyssey – are, the reality is, imaginary retellings of occasions, which took place long before the author’s time. Up to date editors carry on using the same heroes and ideas, indicating in which the inheritance of the worn out tales has suffered . Ancient Fiction and the Shifts with time Regardless of the belief that there are plenty of connotations of traditional stories, the vast majority of specialists concur that your historical stories is a new that is placed no less than 5 various ages some time ago, in addition to a perform in which the storyteller is crafting from research as an alternative to private working experience.

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Draft Analysis: NFL Draft Needs: Seahawks

Written by : Posted on April 23, 2015 : No Comments
This post was originally published on this site

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Evan Silva (@EvanSilva) is the Senior Football Editor for Rotoworld’s NFL Page, and Josh Norris (@JoshNorris) leads Rotoworld’s college football and NFL draft coverage. Together, they’re breaking down every team’s biggest needs and offering potential solutions in May’s draft.

For a breakdown on every team, check out the team-by-team draft preview schedule.

No. 1 Team Need: Offensive line

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

Contrary to popular belief, Seattle has not fielded a strong offensive line during the John Schneider/Pete Carroll era. They’ve relied on Russell Wilson‘s ability to move and escape, as well as Marshawn Lynch‘s capability of creating yardage that isn’t blocked for him. Hence why the Seahawks made no attempt to re-sign free agent LG James Carpenter, and were comfortable trading away C Max Unger to upgrade another position. Still, Seattle’s offensive line could afford upgrades, beginning with center and left guard. OL coach Tom Cable runs a zone-based blocking system that emphasizes athleticism and a nasty demeanor in the trenches.

 

No. 2 Team Need: Wide receiver

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

The Seahawks have one of the NFL’s weakest receiver corps, though it isn’t for a lack of trying. They paid big money to Sidney Rice early in the Schneider/Carroll era, and invested heavily in Percy Harvin later on. Seattle used a top-45 pick on Paul Richardson last year. Richardson shredded his knee and can’t be counted on for 2015, while Doug Baldwin is a slot receiver only. Jermaine Kearse would be better utilized as a reserve sub-package wideout. In the Super Bowl, Chris Matthews gave the Seahawks a taste of what Wilson could do with a size-gifted, jump-ball-winning receiver. The trade for Jimmy Graham certainly helps Seattle’s pass-catching corps, but I’d still expect Schneider to draft an imposing wide receiver with an early-round pick.

 

No. 3 Team Need: Cornerback

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

Newly signed Cary Williams is theoretically a good fit for Seattle’s Cover 3 scheme, and should prove an adequate short-term replacement for Byron Maxwell. Williams is on the wrong side of 30, however, and has a history of maddening on-field inconsistency. He’s gone through long stretches where he’s been easy to beat. Slot corner Jeremy Lane has been ravaged by injuries and tore his ACL in the Super Bowl. He isn’t due back until midseason. Slot is the Seahawks’ most pressing need, though they could use a reinforcement on the perimeter, as well.

Norris’ Mock Draft:

Round 2 (63): WR Devin Funchess, Michigan – I understand the issues people have with Funchess. He dropped too many contested catches for his size. But it would be difficult to find a receiver in this area of the draft like Funchess with the level of ability to be a primary outside, redzone or even big slot target. He dealt with a toe issue since the early parts of the season. The Super Bowl and acquiring Jimmy Graham makes it seem like Seattle is putting an emphasis on contested catches. I also think Seattle moves up or trades down from this spot.

Round 3 (95): EDGE Frank Clark, Michigan – Clark had major off-field issues during his time at Michigan and recently agreed to a plea deal relating to a domestic violence charge. On the field, Clark is an outstanding athlete who flashes bend and a conversion of speed to power. If the team has to move on from one of their edge rushers in the next few seasons for cap reasons, Clark can make an impact.

Round 4 (112): OL Mark Glowinski, West Virginia – As Evan mentioned, the Seahawks have an obvious need at left guard and center. You might think I’m crazy, but in a league where interior linemen are playing earlier and earlier, Glowinski has the talent to start immediately. He fits the athletic profile the Seahawks look for.

Round 4 (130): CB Tye Smith, Towson – Wingspan is a major part of cornerback evaluations for the Seahawks. Smith has a large one in 78-inches. I don’t think he can play inside in the slot, a position Evan pointed to as a need.

Round 4 (134): C Shaq Mason, Georgia Tech – One of my favorite prospects in this class. Mason has taken snaps at center during pro days, but I think he can play guard as well. Few players are as powerful and create as much space in the running game as Mason. His pass protection absolutely needs improvement, but that might just come with repetitions.

Round 5 (167): WR Ty Montgomery, Stanford – The team is still in need of a returner, and Montgomery is one of the best in that area in the draft. That is a very specific role, but the Seahawks understand drafting for roles is wise. As a receiver, montgomery is best with the ball in his hands and might need those touches to be manufactured.

Round 5 (170): RB Zach Zenner, South Dakota State – Another running back for Seattle? Robert Turbin has one year on his deal, Christine Michael has two. Zenner is an awesome athlete who flashes balance and long speed in a variety of weather conditions.

 

Round 6 (181): DT Quayshawne Buckley, Idaho – The Seahawks have so. many. third. day picks. Buckley is an upfield penetrator and could have a role as a disruptor in sub-package situations.

Round 6 (209): LB Alani Fua, BYU – Fua has size, athleticism and is one of the more comfortable linebackers in coverage. He played a drop end role and might fill the on line of scrimmage strongside linebacker position when Bruce Irvin moves down as a pass rusher. Or he could just be a special teamer.

Round 6 (214): S Cedric Thompson, Minnesota – Thompson is unlikely to still be one the board here, but I could see him being a target in a trade up. Other teams have sniped backup safeties for the Seahawks and they need to reload their depth.

Round 7 (248): CB Damian Swann, Goergia – I don’t know if the Seahawks value length at slot corner. If so, Swann doesn’t fit. Seattle has a method and rarely strays from “types,” so keep that in mind if others say they “reach.”

 

Seahawks Current First-Team Offense

 

QB: Russell Wilson

RB: Marshawn Lynch

WR: Doug Baldwin

WR: Jermaine Kearse

TE: Jimmy Graham

TE: Luke Willson

LT: Russell Okung

LG: Alvin Bailey

C: Lemuel Jeanpierre

RG: J.R. Sweezy

RT: Justin Britt

 

Seahawks Current First-Team Defense

 

LE: Michael Bennett

RE: Cliff Avril

NT: Brandon Mebane

DT: Tony McDaniel

MLB: Bobby Wagner

WLB: K.J. Wright

SLB: Bruce Irvin

CB: Richard Sherman

CB: Cary Williams

FS: Earl Thomas

SS: Kam Chancellor

Evan Silva (@EvanSilva) is the Senior Football Editor for Rotoworld’s NFL Page, and Josh Norris (@JoshNorris) leads Rotoworld’s college football and NFL draft coverage. Together, they’re breaking down every team’s biggest needs and offering potential solutions in May’s draft.

For a breakdown on every team, check out the team-by-team draft preview schedule.

No. 1 Team Need: Offensive line

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

Contrary to popular belief, Seattle has not fielded a strong offensive line during the John Schneider/Pete Carroll era. They’ve relied on Russell Wilson‘s ability to move and escape, as well as Marshawn Lynch‘s capability of creating yardage that isn’t blocked for him. Hence why the Seahawks made no attempt to re-sign free agent LG James Carpenter, and were comfortable trading away C Max Unger to upgrade another position. Still, Seattle’s offensive line could afford upgrades, beginning with center and left guard. OL coach Tom Cable runs a zone-based blocking system that emphasizes athleticism and a nasty demeanor in the trenches.

 

No. 2 Team Need: Wide receiver

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

The Seahawks have one of the NFL’s weakest receiver corps, though it isn’t for a lack of trying. They paid big money to Sidney Rice early in the Schneider/Carroll era, and invested heavily in Percy Harvin later on. Seattle used a top-45 pick on Paul Richardson last year. Richardson shredded his knee and can’t be counted on for 2015, while Doug Baldwin is a slot receiver only. Jermaine Kearse would be better utilized as a reserve sub-package wideout. In the Super Bowl, Chris Matthews gave the Seahawks a taste of what Wilson could do with a size-gifted, jump-ball-winning receiver. The trade for Jimmy Graham certainly helps Seattle’s pass-catching corps, but I’d still expect Schneider to draft an imposing wide receiver with an early-round pick.

 

No. 3 Team Need: Cornerback

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

Newly signed Cary Williams is theoretically a good fit for Seattle’s Cover 3 scheme, and should prove an adequate short-term replacement for Byron Maxwell. Williams is on the wrong side of 30, however, and has a history of maddening on-field inconsistency. He’s gone through long stretches where he’s been easy to beat. Slot corner Jeremy Lane has been ravaged by injuries and tore his ACL in the Super Bowl. He isn’t due back until midseason. Slot is the Seahawks’ most pressing need, though they could use a reinforcement on the perimeter, as well.

Norris’ Mock Draft:

Round 2 (63): WR Devin Funchess, Michigan – I understand the issues people have with Funchess. He dropped too many contested catches for his size. But it would be difficult to find a receiver in this area of the draft like Funchess with the level of ability to be a primary outside, redzone or even big slot target. He dealt with a toe issue since the early parts of the season. The Super Bowl and acquiring Jimmy Graham makes it seem like Seattle is putting an emphasis on contested catches. I also think Seattle moves up or trades down from this spot.

Round 3 (95): EDGE Frank Clark, Michigan – Clark had major off-field issues during his time at Michigan and recently agreed to a plea deal relating to a domestic violence charge. On the field, Clark is an outstanding athlete who flashes bend and a conversion of speed to power. If the team has to move on from one of their edge rushers in the next few seasons for cap reasons, Clark can make an impact.

Round 4 (112): OL Mark Glowinski, West Virginia – As Evan mentioned, the Seahawks have an obvious need at left guard and center. You might think I’m crazy, but in a league where interior linemen are playing earlier and earlier, Glowinski has the talent to start immediately. He fits the athletic profile the Seahawks look for.

Round 4 (130): CB Tye Smith, Towson – Wingspan is a major part of cornerback evaluations for the Seahawks. Smith has a large one in 78-inches. I don’t think he can play inside in the slot, a position Evan pointed to as a need.

Round 4 (134): C Shaq Mason, Georgia Tech – One of my favorite prospects in this class. Mason has taken snaps at center during pro days, but I think he can play guard as well. Few players are as powerful and create as much space in the running game as Mason. His pass protection absolutely needs improvement, but that might just come with repetitions.

Round 5 (167): WR Ty Montgomery, Stanford – The team is still in need of a returner, and Montgomery is one of the best in that area in the draft. That is a very specific role, but the Seahawks understand drafting for roles is wise. As a receiver, montgomery is best with the ball in his hands and might need those touches to be manufactured.

Round 5 (170): RB Zach Zenner, South Dakota State – Another running back for Seattle? Robert Turbin has one year on his deal, Christine Michael has two. Zenner is an awesome athlete who flashes balance and long speed in a variety of weather conditions.

 

Round 6 (181): DT Quayshawne Buckley, Idaho – The Seahawks have so. many. third. day picks. Buckley is an upfield penetrator and could have a role as a disruptor in sub-package situations.

Round 6 (209): LB Alani Fua, BYU – Fua has size, athleticism and is one of the more comfortable linebackers in coverage. He played a drop end role and might fill the on line of scrimmage strongside linebacker position when Bruce Irvin moves down as a pass rusher. Or he could just be a special teamer.

Round 6 (214): S Cedric Thompson, Minnesota – Thompson is unlikely to still be one the board here, but I could see him being a target in a trade up. Other teams have sniped backup safeties for the Seahawks and they need to reload their depth.

Round 7 (248): CB Damian Swann, Goergia – I don’t know if the Seahawks value length at slot corner. If so, Swann doesn’t fit. Seattle has a method and rarely strays from “types,” so keep that in mind if others say they “reach.”

 

Seahawks Current First-Team Offense

 

QB: Russell Wilson

RB: Marshawn Lynch

WR: Doug Baldwin

WR: Jermaine Kearse

TE: Jimmy Graham

TE: Luke Willson

LT: Russell Okung

LG: Alvin Bailey

C: Lemuel Jeanpierre

RG: J.R. Sweezy

RT: Justin Britt

 

Seahawks Current First-Team Defense

 

LE: Michael Bennett

RE: Cliff Avril

NT: Brandon Mebane

DT: Tony McDaniel

MLB: Bobby Wagner

WLB: K.J. Wright

SLB: Bruce Irvin

CB: Richard Sherman

CB: Cary Williams

FS: Earl Thomas

SS: Kam Chancellor

Evan Silva is a senior football editor for Rotoworld.com. He can be found on Twitter .
Email :Evan Silva

Offseason Low Down: The Mariota Sweepstakes

Written by : Posted on April 22, 2015 : No Comments
This post was originally published on this site

Anyone who’s ever been to a job interview has probably been asked something along the lines of “where do you see yourself in ten years?” For Oregon quarterback Marcus Mariota, the question should be, “where do I see myself next week?”

With only days remaining until the draft, it’s anyone’s guess where Mariota is headed. Here are ten teams that should be in the hunt.

CLEVELAND BROWNS

The Browns find themselves in the same place they were last year: in need of a quarterback. If we’re being honest, that’s really been the case for the last decade.

It’s safe to say the Johnny Manziel experiment has failed. Cleveland’s current starter, Josh McCown, turns 36 this summer. He’s not the team’s long or short-term answer at quarterback.

The complicated part is that Mariota figures to be long gone by the time the Browns head to the podium with the 12th pick. Cleveland has two first-round picks they can package in a trade. Whether that’s enough to move into the top five, which is where Mariota is likely to go, remains to be seen.

If Mariota does wind up in Cleveland, at least he’ll be protected. Joe Thomas doesn’t let much slip through the cracks, as the Browns allowed just 31 sacks last season. In Pro Football Focus’ year-end rankings, only the Packers’ line scored better in pass protection.

Cleveland’s crop of wide receivers isn’t the greatest. Dwayne Bowe is in steep decline and his new address won’t change that. Andrew Hawkins is actually coming off a decent year (11th in PFF’s receiver rankings) but calling him a star might be a stretch.

People forget this was a 7-9 team last season. If Mariota falls to the Browns, Cleveland could be in the wild card mix.

Don’t forget, for the latest on everything NFL, check out Rotoworld’s Player News, or follow @Rotoworld_FB and @JessePantuosco on Twitter.

CHICAGO BEARS

Contracts aren’t fully guaranteed in the NFL, so a bad deal isn’t the prison sentence found in other sports. Dealing Jay Cutler, though tough to pull off given his $15.5 million cap hit, is not impossible.

But does anyone want him? Given his age, inconsistency and overall demeanor, there won’t be many teams lining up for Cutler’s services.

A Cutler trade is probably what it would take for the Bears to consider Mariota. With so many quarterback-starved teams picking ahead of them, landing Mariota with the seventh pick is probably wishful thinking.

If Mariota does fall into the Bears’ lap, he’ll have a solid foundation on offense. Alshon Jeffery and Martellus Bennett were stellar last season and Matt Forte’s role as a dual threat would give Mariota plenty to work with. Eddie Royal can be useful in the slot. Mariota would have a good but not great line protecting him in Chicago.

NEW ORLEANS SAINTS

The Saints have baffled us repeatedly this offseason. They traded away the game’s best tight end not named Rob Gronkowski (Jimmy Graham, if you didn’t get the hint) as well as promising young wideout Kenny Stills. If New Orleans wants to keep defying logic, all they have to do now is trade Drew Brees.

Don’t put it past them. As excellent as Brees was last season, he won’t last forever. For the Saints, it’s time to start thinking about the future. Maybe that simply means drafting a quarterback in one of the later rounds. Or it could mean the Saints are ready to part with their franchise player.

There is one other option. New Orleans could draft Mariota and let him serve as an apprentice to Brees similar to the way Aaron Rodgers sat on the bench while Brett Favre finished out his career.

Taking a couple years to learn from Brees might actually be in Mariota’s best interest. Look at how fast Robert Griffin III burned out in Washington. Quarterback is a nuanced position that takes time to learn.

Alas, Mariota to the Saints is probably little more than a pipe dream.

NEW YORK JETS

The Jets seem to have recognized that Geno Smith is better suited for backup duty. Ryan Fitzpatrick is a fine placeholder but he’s not someone the Jets can stake their future to. Of course, with the additions of Brandon Marshall, Antonio Cromartie, Darrelle Revis and a host of others, the Jets are built to win right now.

New York is a tough place to succeed. Smith has folded under the pressure the last two seasons and Mark Sanchez wasn’t much better during his time with the Jets. If Mariota was hoping to avoid the spotlight, this isn’t the place for him.

With that said, the Jets have some nice toys for Mariota to play with on offense. Marshall is a top-ten wide receiver when healthy and Eric Decker has two 1,000-yard receiving seasons on his resume. Tight end Jace Amaro hasn’t made the leap yet, but it’s coming. Meanwhile, Stevan Ridley and Chris Ivory are physical backs who can keep the chains moving.

Looking at some of the other teams in the running for Mariota, this wouldn’t be a bad offense to inherit. The question is whether or not Mariota will still be around at pick No. 6. If we’re going by the most recent mock drafts, that seems unlikely.

PHILADELPHIA EAGLES

Bill Belichick seems to have handed the mad scientist baton off to Chip Kelly.

What did Kelly do this offseason? Well, let’s see. He looted the Legion of Boom by stealing away Byron Maxwell and turned DeMarco Murray against the hated Cowboys. On top of that, he traded Napoleon Dynamite lookalike Nick Foles for Sam Bradford and shipped LeSean McCoy off to Buffalo.

All of that leads us to Mariota. We all know how much Kelly enjoys stockpiling players from Oregon. Kelly brought his fast-paced style to Philadelphia, so Mariota wouldn’t be in a vastly different offense than the one he ran at Oregon. Mariota played with a million Darren Sproles types in college and slot receiver Jordan Matthews seems like a good fit for his skill set. The Eagles don’t have a home run threat now that Jeremy Maclin is gone, but Mariota didn’t throw many deep passes at Oregon anyway.

Bradford’s contract is up at the end of the year, so there is incentive to pursue Mariota. Barring an unexpected slide, Mariota will be gone by the time the Eagles pick. Packaging Bradford with the 20th pick would certainly spark trade interest, but it may take more than that to move into the top five. Think of all the picks the Redskins gave up in 2012 just to move up four spots to draft RG3. Kelly’s lust for Mariota might be the worst kept secret in football, so the Eagles won’t have much leverage.

The odds seem to be stacked against the Eagles, but we’ve learned never to count out Kelly. He’s pulled out all the stops before and he’ll do it again. If Kelly decides he really wants Mariota on draft day, he’ll find a way to get him.

Anyone who’s ever been to a job interview has probably been asked something along the lines of “where do you see yourself in ten years?” For Oregon quarterback Marcus Mariota, the question should be, “where do I see myself next week?”

With only days remaining until the draft, it’s anyone’s guess where Mariota is headed. Here are ten teams that should be in the hunt.

CLEVELAND BROWNS

The Browns find themselves in the same place they were last year: in need of a quarterback. If we’re being honest, that’s really been the case for the last decade.

It’s safe to say the Johnny Manziel experiment has failed. Cleveland’s current starter, Josh McCown, turns 36 this summer. He’s not the team’s long or short-term answer at quarterback.

The complicated part is that Mariota figures to be long gone by the time the Browns head to the podium with the 12th pick. Cleveland has two first-round picks they can package in a trade. Whether that’s enough to move into the top five, which is where Mariota is likely to go, remains to be seen.

If Mariota does wind up in Cleveland, at least he’ll be protected. Joe Thomas doesn’t let much slip through the cracks, as the Browns allowed just 31 sacks last season. In Pro Football Focus’ year-end rankings, only the Packers’ line scored better in pass protection.

Cleveland’s crop of wide receivers isn’t the greatest. Dwayne Bowe is in steep decline and his new address won’t change that. Andrew Hawkins is actually coming off a decent year (11th in PFF’s receiver rankings) but calling him a star might be a stretch.

People forget this was a 7-9 team last season. If Mariota falls to the Browns, Cleveland could be in the wild card mix.

Don’t forget, for the latest on everything NFL, check out Rotoworld’s Player News, or follow @Rotoworld_FB and @JessePantuosco on Twitter.

CHICAGO BEARS

Contracts aren’t fully guaranteed in the NFL, so a bad deal isn’t the prison sentence found in other sports. Dealing Jay Cutler, though tough to pull off given his $15.5 million cap hit, is not impossible.

But does anyone want him? Given his age, inconsistency and overall demeanor, there won’t be many teams lining up for Cutler’s services.

A Cutler trade is probably what it would take for the Bears to consider Mariota. With so many quarterback-starved teams picking ahead of them, landing Mariota with the seventh pick is probably wishful thinking.

If Mariota does fall into the Bears’ lap, he’ll have a solid foundation on offense. Alshon Jeffery and Martellus Bennett were stellar last season and Matt Forte’s role as a dual threat would give Mariota plenty to work with. Eddie Royal can be useful in the slot. Mariota would have a good but not great line protecting him in Chicago.

NEW ORLEANS SAINTS

The Saints have baffled us repeatedly this offseason. They traded away the game’s best tight end not named Rob Gronkowski (Jimmy Graham, if you didn’t get the hint) as well as promising young wideout Kenny Stills. If New Orleans wants to keep defying logic, all they have to do now is trade Drew Brees.

Don’t put it past them. As excellent as Brees was last season, he won’t last forever. For the Saints, it’s time to start thinking about the future. Maybe that simply means drafting a quarterback in one of the later rounds. Or it could mean the Saints are ready to part with their franchise player.

There is one other option. New Orleans could draft Mariota and let him serve as an apprentice to Brees similar to the way Aaron Rodgers sat on the bench while Brett Favre finished out his career.

Taking a couple years to learn from Brees might actually be in Mariota’s best interest. Look at how fast Robert Griffin III burned out in Washington. Quarterback is a nuanced position that takes time to learn.

Alas, Mariota to the Saints is probably little more than a pipe dream.

NEW YORK JETS

The Jets seem to have recognized that Geno Smith is better suited for backup duty. Ryan Fitzpatrick is a fine placeholder but he’s not someone the Jets can stake their future to. Of course, with the additions of Brandon Marshall, Antonio Cromartie, Darrelle Revis and a host of others, the Jets are built to win right now.

New York is a tough place to succeed. Smith has folded under the pressure the last two seasons and Mark Sanchez wasn’t much better during his time with the Jets. If Mariota was hoping to avoid the spotlight, this isn’t the place for him.

With that said, the Jets have some nice toys for Mariota to play with on offense. Marshall is a top-ten wide receiver when healthy and Eric Decker has two 1,000-yard receiving seasons on his resume. Tight end Jace Amaro hasn’t made the leap yet, but it’s coming. Meanwhile, Stevan Ridley and Chris Ivory are physical backs who can keep the chains moving.

Looking at some of the other teams in the running for Mariota, this wouldn’t be a bad offense to inherit. The question is whether or not Mariota will still be around at pick No. 6. If we’re going by the most recent mock drafts, that seems unlikely.

PHILADELPHIA EAGLES

Bill Belichick seems to have handed the mad scientist baton off to Chip Kelly.

What did Kelly do this offseason? Well, let’s see. He looted the Legion of Boom by stealing away Byron Maxwell and turned DeMarco Murray against the hated Cowboys. On top of that, he traded Napoleon Dynamite lookalike Nick Foles for Sam Bradford and shipped LeSean McCoy off to Buffalo.

All of that leads us to Mariota. We all know how much Kelly enjoys stockpiling players from Oregon. Kelly brought his fast-paced style to Philadelphia, so Mariota wouldn’t be in a vastly different offense than the one he ran at Oregon. Mariota played with a million Darren Sproles types in college and slot receiver Jordan Matthews seems like a good fit for his skill set. The Eagles don’t have a home run threat now that Jeremy Maclin is gone, but Mariota didn’t throw many deep passes at Oregon anyway.

Bradford’s contract is up at the end of the year, so there is incentive to pursue Mariota. Barring an unexpected slide, Mariota will be gone by the time the Eagles pick. Packaging Bradford with the 20th pick would certainly spark trade interest, but it may take more than that to move into the top five. Think of all the picks the Redskins gave up in 2012 just to move up four spots to draft RG3. Kelly’s lust for Mariota might be the worst kept secret in football, so the Eagles won’t have much leverage.

The odds seem to be stacked against the Eagles, but we’ve learned never to count out Kelly. He’s pulled out all the stops before and he’ll do it again. If Kelly decides he really wants Mariota on draft day, he’ll find a way to get him.

SAN DIEGO CHARGERS

Enter the dark horse. The Chargers can’t risk having Philip Rivers bolt (no pun intended) at the end of his contract and the Titans have shown they could be willing to play ball with the second pick. Rivers and the 17th pick for the chance to draft Mariota at No. 2 is certainly a trade possibility the Chargers will want to think long and hard about.

California is closer to Mariota’s Hawaiian roots, but that isn’t even the Chargers’ biggest selling point. San Diego is a fringe playoff team already with young players like Keenan Allen and Ladarius Green ready to make big leaps forward. Ol’ reliable Antonio Gates always presents a tough matchup in the red zone while pint-sized Danny Woodhead offers more versatility than your average back. For Mariota, the tools are all there.

The question now is whether or not Mariota is ready for the spotlight of Los Angeles. The Chargers are hoping to share a stadium with the Raiders there in a few years and Mariota would surely be the face of the franchise. Mariota has had some of his best games at the Rose Bowl (2-0 there last season), so he’s no stranger to the City of Angels.

ST. LOUIS RAMS

The Rams subtly announced their interest in Mariota by flying to Eugene this past month to work him out. If you look at the Rams’ roster, it’s easy to see where Mariota fits in. Tavon Austin is the most Oregon player ever (bizarre, considering he went to West Virginia) and Stedman Bailey (another WVU alum, if you can believe it) has just as much talent. With gadget players like Austin, the Rams could really college things up if they wanted to. Screens, read options, pistol sets, whatever.

None of those plays would work with statuesque Nick Foles under center. Foles also happens to be entering the final year of his rookie deal, which might explain the team’s quiet pursuit of Mariota.

General manager Les Snead may have to put his trade hat on to make this work. Poaching Mariota at No. 10 seems like a long shot.

Mariota would be nice to have, but St. Louis has other needs. Adding Kevin White, a true playmaker at wide receiver (and amazingly another graduate of West Virginia!), makes a ton of sense for the Rams. There’s a good chance he’ll still be around at No. 10.

TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS

The Buccaneers own the first pick in this year’s draft, giving them the clearest path to Mariota if they choose to go that route.

Florida State’s Jameis Winston isn’t a lock to go first, though he remains the favorite for a variety of reasons. He played in a pro style system at FSU, lost just one game in his two years as starter and though Mike Glennon has done just fine for Tampa Bay, he offers a much lower ceiling than Winston. Plus, teams are intrigued to see what Winston can do now that he’s fully committed to football. Throughout his high school and college careers Winston spent half the year playing baseball.

Winston’s off-field concerns, including an ongoing legal battle tied to an alleged rape, are why Mariota is getting consideration for the first pick. Of the two players, there’s no doubt Mariota is the more accurate thrower. Among FBS signal callers, only New Mexico State’s Tyler Rogers threw more picks (23) than Winston (18) last season. That’s a major red flag.

If Mariota does go first, he’ll have some weapons to work with. Vincent Jackson and Mike Evans both went over the 1,000-yard hump last year and the Bucs believe enormous tight end Austin Seferian-Jenkins is capable of a breakout season.

The downside is Tampa Bay’s running game isn’t very reliable. Doug Martin seems to have peaked and scat back Bobby Rainey isn’t workhorse material. Marshawn Lynch’s meteoric rise helped Russell Wilson immensely in his first few years in Seattle. Mariota wouldn’t have that luxury in Tampa. With the Bucs, he’d be dealing with a lot of third-and-longs. 

TENNESSEE TITANS

Tennessee’s reluctance here is a bit puzzling. There’s a good chance they’ll end up taking Mariota at No. 2, but there’s also been plenty of talk about staying the course with Zach Mettenberger. That’s preposterous. Mettenberger started six games last year and won none of them.

If the Titans desperately needed a defensive end or an outside linebacker, taking Leonard Williams, Dante Fowler or even Shane Ray with the second pick wouldn’t be the worst thing in the world. But that isn’t the case. Tennessee spent a boatload of cash to shore up those spots during free agency. If anything, that position is now one of Tennessee’s biggest strengths.

There’s a reason the Titans have the second pick in the draft. Even on a good day, the Titans don’t have much talent on offense. Kendall Wright regressed badly last season (57 catches, down from 94 in 2013) and Bishop Sankey seems to be going through the motions (3.7 yards per carry as a rookie). Delanie Walker was a bright spot, but he’s already in his 30s.

At least we know Mariota would be in good hands with head coach Ken Whisenhunt. He resurrected the careers of Kurt Warner and Philip Rivers at previous coaching stops and has also worked with Ben Roethlisberger. Of course, that link to Rivers could convince Whisenhunt to pull the trigger on a trade with San Diego.

WASHINGTON REDSKINS

Do they dare?

Robert Griffin III’s career has been spiraling out of control for two years. Either the Redskins haven’t tried hard enough to trade Kirk Cousins or nobody wants him. What’s left is one of the sketchiest quarterback situations in the league.

If the Titans pass on Mariota, there’s a very real chance he could fall to the Redskins at No. 5. Jacksonville and Oakland both drafted their quarterbacks of the future last season. It would certainly be a bold move, especially given Mariota’s similarities to RG3.

Washington’s offense isn’t a train wreck, but it wouldn’t be ideal for Mariota. DeSean Jackson is obviously a stud but Pierre Garcon can’t be trusted and neither can injury-prone tight end Jordan Reed. Mariota is used to running backs that double as receivers, and Alfred Morris isn’t one of those.

As a former quarterback himself, you would think Jay Gruden would have solved the Redskins’ quarterback conundrum by now. That hasn’t happened. Mariota might be talented enough to weather the storm in Washington, but this wouldn’t be the best place for him.

Draft Analysis: NFL Draft Needs: Rams

Written by : Posted on April 22, 2015 : No Comments
This post was originally published on this site

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Evan Silva (@EvanSilva) is the Senior Football Editor for Rotoworld’s NFL Page, and Josh Norris (@JoshNorris) leads Rotoworld’s college football and NFL draft coverage. Together, they’re breaking down every team’s biggest needs and offering potential solutions in May’s draft.

For a breakdown on every team, check out the team-by-team draft preview schedule.

 

No. 1 Team Need: Offensive Line

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

Maybe the Rams know something no one else does about Brandon Washington and Tim Barnes. On paper, there isn’t a worse offensive line in the league. LT Greg Robinson and OG Rodger Saffold are the only bankable starters, and Robinson is coming off a rough rookie year. St. Louis needs three new starting linemen, ideally at center, right guard and right tackle. To stay competitive in games, the Rams are built to be a team that runs the football with volume and plays top-notch defense. Therefore, St. Louis should target proficient run blockers in the draft.

 

No. 2 Team Need: Quarterback

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

The Rams traded for Nick Foles, but he is entering the final year of his contract. On the field, Foles is best suited to manage games. The Rams are expected to use a second-day pick on a quarterback, although this year’s QB class isn’t quite brimming with potential future starters in rounds two and three. The system new OC Frank Cignetti intends to run also isn’t exactly clear. He will presumably design the offense to maximize Foles’ strengths and minimize Foles’ weaknesses. Foles is an immobile pocket passer whose mechanics and accuracy tend to nosedive the longer he holds onto the ball. Cignetti should encourage Foles to get the ball out of his hands quickly.

 

No. 3 Team Need: Wide receiver

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

The Rams may also target secondary help in the draft. Wide receiver has appeared to be a weakness in St. Louis since the days of Torry Holt and Isaac Bruce, although poor quarterback play has had a limiting effect on those wideouts’ numbers. Particularly if Brian Quick‘s reconstructed shoulder hinders him into the season, St. Louis will need a legitimate No. 1 receiver. Stedman Bailey is best suited to a No. 2/3 role, while Kenny Britt isn’t the vertical presence he once was. Tavon Austin is a bust. The Rams could use a physical tackle breaker after the catch to complement Foles’ passing style.

Norris’ Mock Draft

Round 1 (10): OL La’El Collins, LSU – I absolutely love Collins’ fit with the Rams. However, I’m not sure how he fits on the right side – which Evan mentioned as the need. Collins is a mauler who will move his man off the ball in the running game. In the passing game his strength compensates for possible movement deficiencies, but I think Collins moves much better than given credit for.

Round 2 (41): LB Benardrick McKinney, Miss State – My friend Tony Pauline has consistently linked McKinney to the Rams, either after trading back in the first round or trading up from this selection. The team can easily move on from James Laurinaitis after this season, but who knows if they are willing to. McKinney is an aggressive linebacker who prefers to move forward and intelligently work through defenders. The Rams lack that among their linebackers.

Round 3 (72): WR Kenny Bell, Nebraska – It is difficult to nail down which receivers will be available in the third round. Bell should be selected earlier than many are predicting. There is body control, agility, and speed in his game.

Round 4 (119): QB Garrett Grayson, Colorado State – The Rams are likely in the market for a quarterback, but the pickings are slim. Grayson has experience working through “progressions,” albeit many were simplified, but teams will like that background. His ceiling might be as a backup with a chance to start in spot situations.

Round 6 (215): EDGE Cedric Reed, Texas – There were high expectations for Reed, but the edge rusher was limited due to a meniscus injury. I was actually impressed with the flashes Reed produced. The Rams likely need to re-do Chris Long’s deal next offseason.

Round 7 (227): OL Trenton Brown, Florida – More mass up front. Brown likely plays guard at the NFL level. He is a behemoth who will need to use his power to compensate for a lack of movement. This fits the line of thinking that the Rams want to focus on a powerful running game.

 

Rams Current First-Team Offense

 

QB: Nick Foles

RB: Tre Mason

WR: Brian Quick

WR: Kenny Britt

TE: Jared Cook

TE: Lance Kendricks

LT: Greg Robinson

LG: Brandon Washington

C: Tim Barnes

RG: Rodger Saffold

RT: Garrett Reynolds

 

Rams Current First-Team Defense

 

LE: Chris Long

RE: Robert Quinn

DT: Aaron Donald

NT: Michael Brockers

MLB: James Laurinaitis

WLB: Alec Ogletree

SLB: Akeem Ayers

CB: E.J. Gaines

CB: Janoris Jenkins

FS: Rodney McLeod

SS: T.J. McDonald

Evan Silva (@EvanSilva) is the Senior Football Editor for Rotoworld’s NFL Page, and Josh Norris (@JoshNorris) leads Rotoworld’s college football and NFL draft coverage. Together, they’re breaking down every team’s biggest needs and offering potential solutions in May’s draft.

For a breakdown on every team, check out the team-by-team draft preview schedule.

 

No. 1 Team Need: Offensive Line

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

Maybe the Rams know something no one else does about Brandon Washington and Tim Barnes. On paper, there isn’t a worse offensive line in the league. LT Greg Robinson and OG Rodger Saffold are the only bankable starters, and Robinson is coming off a rough rookie year. St. Louis needs three new starting linemen, ideally at center, right guard and right tackle. To stay competitive in games, the Rams are built to be a team that runs the football with volume and plays top-notch defense. Therefore, St. Louis should target proficient run blockers in the draft.

 

No. 2 Team Need: Quarterback

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

The Rams traded for Nick Foles, but he is entering the final year of his contract. On the field, Foles is best suited to manage games. The Rams are expected to use a second-day pick on a quarterback, although this year’s QB class isn’t quite brimming with potential future starters in rounds two and three. The system new OC Frank Cignetti intends to run also isn’t exactly clear. He will presumably design the offense to maximize Foles’ strengths and minimize Foles’ weaknesses. Foles is an immobile pocket passer whose mechanics and accuracy tend to nosedive the longer he holds onto the ball. Cignetti should encourage Foles to get the ball out of his hands quickly.

 

No. 3 Team Need: Wide receiver

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

The Rams may also target secondary help in the draft. Wide receiver has appeared to be a weakness in St. Louis since the days of Torry Holt and Isaac Bruce, although poor quarterback play has had a limiting effect on those wideouts’ numbers. Particularly if Brian Quick‘s reconstructed shoulder hinders him into the season, St. Louis will need a legitimate No. 1 receiver. Stedman Bailey is best suited to a No. 2/3 role, while Kenny Britt isn’t the vertical presence he once was. Tavon Austin is a bust. The Rams could use a physical tackle breaker after the catch to complement Foles’ passing style.

Norris’ Mock Draft

Round 1 (10): OL La’El Collins, LSU – I absolutely love Collins’ fit with the Rams. However, I’m not sure how he fits on the right side – which Evan mentioned as the need. Collins is a mauler who will move his man off the ball in the running game. In the passing game his strength compensates for possible movement deficiencies, but I think Collins moves much better than given credit for.

Round 2 (41): LB Benardrick McKinney, Miss State – My friend Tony Pauline has consistently linked McKinney to the Rams, either after trading back in the first round or trading up from this selection. The team can easily move on from James Laurinaitis after this season, but who knows if they are willing to. McKinney is an aggressive linebacker who prefers to move forward and intelligently work through defenders. The Rams lack that among their linebackers.

Round 3 (72): WR Kenny Bell, Nebraska – It is difficult to nail down which receivers will be available in the third round. Bell should be selected earlier than many are predicting. There is body control, agility, and speed in his game.

Round 4 (119): QB Garrett Grayson, Colorado State – The Rams are likely in the market for a quarterback, but the pickings are slim. Grayson has experience working through “progressions,” albeit many were simplified, but teams will like that background. His ceiling might be as a backup with a chance to start in spot situations.

Round 6 (215): EDGE Cedric Reed, Texas – There were high expectations for Reed, but the edge rusher was limited due to a meniscus injury. I was actually impressed with the flashes Reed produced. The Rams likely need to re-do Chris Long’s deal next offseason.

Round 7 (227): OL Trenton Brown, Florida – More mass up front. Brown likely plays guard at the NFL level. He is a behemoth who will need to use his power to compensate for a lack of movement. This fits the line of thinking that the Rams want to focus on a powerful running game.

 

Rams Current First-Team Offense

 

QB: Nick Foles

RB: Tre Mason

WR: Brian Quick

WR: Kenny Britt

TE: Jared Cook

TE: Lance Kendricks

LT: Greg Robinson

LG: Brandon Washington

C: Tim Barnes

RG: Rodger Saffold

RT: Garrett Reynolds

 

Rams Current First-Team Defense

 

LE: Chris Long

RE: Robert Quinn

DT: Aaron Donald

NT: Michael Brockers

MLB: James Laurinaitis

WLB: Alec Ogletree

SLB: Akeem Ayers

CB: E.J. Gaines

CB: Janoris Jenkins

FS: Rodney McLeod

SS: T.J. McDonald

Evan Silva is a senior football editor for Rotoworld.com. He can be found on Twitter .
Email :Evan Silva

Future Obstacles of Medical care Treatment

Written by : Posted on April 22, 2015 : No Comments

Future Obstacles of Medical care Treatment

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Draft Analysis: NFL Draft Needs: Cardinals

Written by : Posted on April 21, 2015 : No Comments
This post was originally published on this site

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Evan Silva (@EvanSilva) is the Senior Football Editor for Rotoworld’s NFL Page, and Josh Norris (@JoshNorris) leads Rotoworld’s college football and NFL draft coverage. Together, they’re breaking down every team’s biggest needs and offering potential solutions in May’s draft.

For a breakdown on every team, check out the team-by-team draft preview schedule.

No. 1 Team Need: Running back

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

Carson Palmer is 35 years old and coming off reconstructive knee surgery, while Andre Ellington failed in the Cardinals’ feature back role last season, averaging 3.28 yards per carry before succumbing to a multitude of injuries. Arizona needs a way to move the chains when the passing game is out of sync. Coach Bruce Arians and GM Steve Keim have openly spoken of adding a big running back capable of handling workhorse carries. They’ve been linked to Adrian Peterson and Todd Gurley.

 

No. 2 Team Need: Nose tackle

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

Arizona is set on the ends after pairing Cory Redding with Calais Campbell, but there’s a hole at nose tackle following Dan Williams‘ free-agent departure. Corey Peters (6’3/300) isn’t a true nose, and Alameda Ta’amu has been an injury-plagued enigma. In order to maintain one of the NFL’s premier run defenses, the Cardinals need an answer at zero technique.

 

No. 3 Team Need: Linebacker

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

The Cardinals’ offensive line could use an injection of talent, particularly on the interior. The cornerback position also has question marks after Antonio Cromartie returned to New York. Linebacker still stands out as a top-three weakness with help needed outside and inside. Arizona can’t realistically count on LaMarr Woodley to rediscover his early-career form, while ILB Sean Weatherspoon is coming off a torn Achilles’. The Cardinals need a speed rusher and competition at inside linebacker.

Norris’ Mock Draft:

Round 1 (24): EDGE Shane Ray, Missouri – I do think Ray stays on the board until the later third of round one. From an athleticism standpoint, Ray tested in the 18.5 percentile for NFL edge rushers. However, by looking at the roster athleticism does not seem to be a priority for the position in the eyes of the Cardinals. Ray does maximize and somewhat compensate for the lack of natural athleticism with an outstanding motor and toughness at the point of attack.

Round 2 (55): RB T.J. Yeldon, Alabama – Evan called for a back capable of handling workhorse carries. Yeldon was never asked to do that at Alabama, but I think he has the talent and ability to do it in the NFL. He is a smooth, balanced runner who falls forward when going to the ground and displays an extra gear when seeing the endzone.

Round 3 (86): CB Steven Nelson, Oregon State – With the NFL focused so much on size and length at corner, Nelson might slip through the cracks. He is not small (5’10/197 lbs) and measures in taller than Jerraud Powers. On top of that Nelson plays big on the outside and is aggressive at the catch point or when closing in space.

Round 4 (123): LB Jordan Hicks, Texas – The cardinals have one coverage box defender in Deone Bucannon and could use another in Hicks. Jordan battled injuries at Texas which is something teams have vetted during the process. Above all, Hicks has enough talent to at least be a role player.

Round 5 (159): NT Tyeler Davison, Fresno State – This is a perfect match, especially considering the Cardinals have worked out Davison. Teams believe they can find adequate zero techniques later in the draft or even among the undrafted free agents. Davison is a bit more than the common prospect, as he is a very good athlete for his size. A superior athlete than Danny Shelton by a considerable margin, in fact.

Round 6 (198): WR Tyrell Williams, Western Oregon – Another prospect the Cardinals have expressed interest in. With Larry Fitzgerald’s game declining, the Cardinals could look for a “flier” with size to play on the outside. I’m not saying Williams can take Fitz’s place.

Round 7 (241): C Nick Easton, Harvard – A favorite of mine. Easton is one of the draft’s top athletes along the offensive line and is an occupier at the anchor spot. The Cardinals could upgrade their center position.

Round 7 (256): EDGE Deion Barnes, Penn State – I know Barnes left Penn State early. I know he attended the Senior Bowl. But the lack of a Combine invite and little buzz makes me think he could still be available here.

 

Cardinals Current First-Team Offense

 

QB: Carson Palmer

RB: Andre Ellington

WR: Larry Fitzgerald

WR: Michael Floyd

WR: John Brown

TE: Darren Fells

LT: Jared Veldheer

LG: Mike Iupati

C: A.Q. Shipley

RG: Jonathan Cooper

RT: Bobby Massie

 

Cardinals Current First-Team Defense

 

LE: Cory Redding

RE: Calais Campbell

NT: Corey Peters

OLB: Alex Okafor

OLB: LaMarr Woodley

ILB: Sean Weatherspoon

ILB: Kevin Minter

CB: Patrick Peterson

CB: Justin Bethel

FS: Rashad Johnson

SS: Tyrann Mathieu

Evan Silva (@EvanSilva) is the Senior Football Editor for Rotoworld’s NFL Page, and Josh Norris (@JoshNorris) leads Rotoworld’s college football and NFL draft coverage. Together, they’re breaking down every team’s biggest needs and offering potential solutions in May’s draft.

For a breakdown on every team, check out the team-by-team draft preview schedule.

No. 1 Team Need: Running back

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

Carson Palmer is 35 years old and coming off reconstructive knee surgery, while Andre Ellington failed in the Cardinals’ feature back role last season, averaging 3.28 yards per carry before succumbing to a multitude of injuries. Arizona needs a way to move the chains when the passing game is out of sync. Coach Bruce Arians and GM Steve Keim have openly spoken of adding a big running back capable of handling workhorse carries. They’ve been linked to Adrian Peterson and Todd Gurley.

 

No. 2 Team Need: Nose tackle

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

Arizona is set on the ends after pairing Cory Redding with Calais Campbell, but there’s a hole at nose tackle following Dan Williams‘ free-agent departure. Corey Peters (6’3/300) isn’t a true nose, and Alameda Ta’amu has been an injury-plagued enigma. In order to maintain one of the NFL’s premier run defenses, the Cardinals need an answer at zero technique.

 

No. 3 Team Need: Linebacker

 

Silva’s Analysis

 

The Cardinals’ offensive line could use an injection of talent, particularly on the interior. The cornerback position also has question marks after Antonio Cromartie returned to New York. Linebacker still stands out as a top-three weakness with help needed outside and inside. Arizona can’t realistically count on LaMarr Woodley to rediscover his early-career form, while ILB Sean Weatherspoon is coming off a torn Achilles’. The Cardinals need a speed rusher and competition at inside linebacker.

Norris’ Mock Draft:

Round 1 (24): EDGE Shane Ray, Missouri – I do think Ray stays on the board until the later third of round one. From an athleticism standpoint, Ray tested in the 18.5 percentile for NFL edge rushers. However, by looking at the roster athleticism does not seem to be a priority for the position in the eyes of the Cardinals. Ray does maximize and somewhat compensate for the lack of natural athleticism with an outstanding motor and toughness at the point of attack.

Round 2 (55): RB T.J. Yeldon, Alabama – Evan called for a back capable of handling workhorse carries. Yeldon was never asked to do that at Alabama, but I think he has the talent and ability to do it in the NFL. He is a smooth, balanced runner who falls forward when going to the ground and displays an extra gear when seeing the endzone.

Round 3 (86): CB Steven Nelson, Oregon State – With the NFL focused so much on size and length at corner, Nelson might slip through the cracks. He is not small (5’10/197 lbs) and measures in taller than Jerraud Powers. On top of that Nelson plays big on the outside and is aggressive at the catch point or when closing in space.

Round 4 (123): LB Jordan Hicks, Texas – The cardinals have one coverage box defender in Deone Bucannon and could use another in Hicks. Jordan battled injuries at Texas which is something teams have vetted during the process. Above all, Hicks has enough talent to at least be a role player.

Round 5 (159): NT Tyeler Davison, Fresno State – This is a perfect match, especially considering the Cardinals have worked out Davison. Teams believe they can find adequate zero techniques later in the draft or even among the undrafted free agents. Davison is a bit more than the common prospect, as he is a very good athlete for his size. A superior athlete than Danny Shelton by a considerable margin, in fact.

Round 6 (198): WR Tyrell Williams, Western Oregon – Another prospect the Cardinals have expressed interest in. With Larry Fitzgerald’s game declining, the Cardinals could look for a “flier” with size to play on the outside. I’m not saying Williams can take Fitz’s place.

Round 7 (241): C Nick Easton, Harvard – A favorite of mine. Easton is one of the draft’s top athletes along the offensive line and is an occupier at the anchor spot. The Cardinals could upgrade their center position.

Round 7 (256): EDGE Deion Barnes, Penn State – I know Barnes left Penn State early. I know he attended the Senior Bowl. But the lack of a Combine invite and little buzz makes me think he could still be available here.

 

Cardinals Current First-Team Offense

 

QB: Carson Palmer

RB: Andre Ellington

WR: Larry Fitzgerald

WR: Michael Floyd

WR: John Brown

TE: Darren Fells

LT: Jared Veldheer

LG: Mike Iupati

C: A.Q. Shipley

RG: Jonathan Cooper

RT: Bobby Massie

 

Cardinals Current First-Team Defense

 

LE: Cory Redding

RE: Calais Campbell

NT: Corey Peters

OLB: Alex Okafor

OLB: LaMarr Woodley

ILB: Sean Weatherspoon

ILB: Kevin Minter

CB: Patrick Peterson

CB: Justin Bethel

FS: Rashad Johnson

SS: Tyrann Mathieu

Evan Silva is a senior football editor for Rotoworld.com. He can be found on Twitter .
Email :Evan Silva

Crucial Research Into The Most In-demand SEARCH ENGINES

Written by : Posted on April 21, 2015 : No Comments

Crucial Research Into The Most In-demand SEARCH ENGINES

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